Pakistan Army News: Jan.-Dec.2013

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Ukraine to deliver 110 Battle Tank Engines to Pakistan

KIEV, February 18 (RIA Novosti) - Ukraine will deliver 110 tank power plants – engines and related parts – to Pakistan under a $50 million contract, state-run arms exporter Ukrspetsstroi said on Monday.

The power plants will be manufactured at the Kharkov-based Malyshev Plant, a state-run enterprise specializing in armored vehicles and their components, under a four-year contract that was signed “several days ago,” Ukrspetsstroi said in a statement on its website.

It did not provide any technical specifications.

Ukraine previously delivered more than 300 power plants to Pakistan for its al-Khalid main battle tank, Ukrspetsstroi's acting deputy general director Vadim Kozhevnikov said, adding that Ukraine also supplies tank engines to China.

The statement cited Kozhevnikov as saying he believed Ukraine is in a good position to compete with the world’s leading tank power plant manufacturers, in particular Germany.

“We are direct competitors of German engine manufacturers. Our models are every bit as good as theirs in terms of technical characteristics but are significantly cheaper,” Kozhevnikov said.

http://en.ria.ru/business/20130218/179551243.html

Edited by pshamim
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These for Batch I / II ? or new tank on model of Chinese MBT-3000 ?

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Could be for T-80UDs, could be for Al-Khalids or for new tanks to be assembled. Keep in mind that the T-80s are coming to a point in their life where some engines may be needing replacements and both T-80s and AKs would require engine spares as well since they equip the units with the strike corps and need to be kept in high state of readiness for operational use.

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PA current tank inventory

1 - 320 T-80 UD

2 - 325 AK -1

3 - 350 AZ

4 - 250 Type - 85 II AP

5 - 200 Type - 69 II

6 - 500 Type - 59 IIP

total of - 1945

Almost 1275 considered as been relatively modern. rest are obsolete

Edited by syed_yusuf

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I wouldn't say rest are obsolete, depending upon how they are used in formation. Two/Three AK/T-80/AZ leading and followed by Three/Two Type 69-II/Type 59s can be very formidable platton. Just as pair of F-16s / JF-17s leading with pair of Mirage / F-7s along side.

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Is the plan to upgrade all T-59s and T-69s to Al-Zarrar standard? When will this be completed?

Are the Al-Zarrar tanks fitted with Battlefield Management System?

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PA current tank inventory

1 - 320 T-80 UD

2 - 325 AK -1

3 - 350 AZ

4 - 250 Type - 85 II AP

5 - 200 Type - 69 II

6 - 500 Type - 59 IIP

total of - 1945

Almost 1275 considered as been relatively modern. rest are obsolete

As of today, AZ numbers between 650-700, There is another Type-59 based modification named Type-59M2 which is slightly inferior to AZ but has thermal imager, image intensification sights, AC, IFCS, upgraded engine and improved composite armour. It is similar to Type-60IIMPs

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Is the plan to upgrade all T-59s and T-69s to Al-Zarrar standard? When will this be completed?

Are the Al-Zarrar tanks fitted with Battlefield Management System?

Yes, some AZs are fitted with IBMS, sort of command versions.

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So how many old tanks are left? 400?

If all tanks are networked, then they can be a formidable fighting force.

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Cash-Strapped Army Still Plans on Helping Pakistan Fight Narcotics

BY SPENCER ACKERMAN02.21.1311:53 AM

U.S. and Pakistani soldiers greet each other on the Afghanistan border, January 2013. Next up: collaborating on stopping Pakistan’s flow of drugs. Photo: U.S. Army

The war on terrorism isn’t the only endless war the U.S. is waging. The drug war never went away, it just went overseas — and the U.S. military is lending new support to an effort to stem narcotics in Pakistan.

A series of new solicitations by the Army Corps of Engineers show that even in these cash-strapped times, the U.S. is willing to build new structures, including in major airports, for its Pakistani frenemies to sniff out drug smugglers.

At the southern Pakistani city of Karachi, the Army expects to build a 7,000-square-foot command center right inside Jinnah International Airport. Complete with a “cell/interrogation building,” the new center will help provide “quick-response to constantly evolving narcotics and contraband smuggling tactics.” Among the chief beneficiaries: Pakistan’s “Rummaging and Patrolling Section,” which apparently exists. Cost: up to $2 million.

Then there’s another 28,300-square-foot command center the Army wants to construct in Islamabad. This one will be operated by Pakistan’s DEA-mentored “elite, vetted” Anti-Narcotic Force Special Investigative Cell. At the command center, the Cell will “carry out liaison with international counterparts, compile sensitive drug related intelligence, conduct sophisticated investigations, and plan interdiction operations.” Cost: up to $5 million.

Pakistan is a hub for drug trafficking — not just the narcotics coming in through the opiate breadbasket next door in Afghanistan, but precursor chemicals like acetic anhydride, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. The U.S. interest in assisting Pakistan hunt narcotics dealers is less clear, particularly as the military lights its hair on fire warning about the disastrous impact of automatic spending cuts looming on March 1. To scare Congress into reversing the cuts, the Army this week released a state-by-state breakdown of what a loss of $18 billion this year from its operations account would look like.

Yet counternarcotics is one of the most lucrative sources of government contracting, and one that ties the war on drugs into the war on terrorism. A Pentagon bureau known as the Counter Narco-Terrorism Program Office is staffing up in Kabul to run Afghanistan’s drug war. And in 2011, it disbursed a pot of money worth more than $3 billion for security contractors everywhere from Mexico to Azerbaijan, making it one of the most lucrative security-contracting agencies in the entire U.S. government. It’ll be a long time before the U.S. military gets out of the south-Asian anti-drug game, whatever the budget situation might be.

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2013/02/pakistan-drugs/?utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed

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Just for the record to counter the misconception about those in Khaki getting off lightly in the legal system:

 

Army men and criminal proceedings
Published 2013-07-16 07:31:35

THE news report on the subject (July 13), quoting the AG and Advocate Mohammad Ibrahim Satti, does not give a clear picture about criminal proceedings against a serving army officer, or for that matter any of the three armed forces’ serving personnel. In order to dispel any impression that armed forces’ personnel are perhaps above the law, it is desirable to briefly describe the correct legal position in the matter.

Since the armed forces have their own legal system provided in their respective manuals, any serving armed forces personnel charged with any offence, whether a traffic offence or theft or murder can, subject to certain exceptions, be tried by a court martial or dealt with summarily.

The procedure is like this. Except for offences of murder, culpable homicide not amounting to murder or rape against civilians, all other offences can be tried under the respective service laws either summarily or by a court-martial, depending upon their gravity.

When a member of the armed forces is charged with any other offence, the commanding officer of the person concerned can claim him for dealing with him under the respective service law. The civil authority can refuse to hand over such a person in which case the matter goes to the federal government for decision. To my knowledge no such case has happened.

The personnel of the armed forces are, therefore, not above the law but, being in a disciplined service, are liable to suffer more severe punishment than their civilian counterparts for the same offence. For example, if a member of the armed forces is tried in a case of theft by a magistrate, he can get away with a simple fine but if tried by a court martial he may suffer imprisonment and sure dismissal from service, losing his pension and other terminal benefits. This is to maintain discipline.

Let me give another example. If a civilian clerk does not say ‘salaam’ to his officer, nothing happens. But if a soldier does not salute an officer, he can go to jail for two years.

This is how the system of crime and punishment works in the armed forces.

GROUP CAPTAIN ® S. M. ANWAR
Karachi

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Appointing a new army chief

By Muhammad Ali Ehsan

Published: July 29, 2013

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The writer is a research scholar who is doing PhD in civil-military relations from Karachi University. He retired as a lieutenant colonel in the Pakistan Army

In the context of the game of golf — the most favourite game of our general officers — the appointment of the COAS in the army is like the ‘Kevlar driver’ in the golf bag. Other clubs are also good; they may even be used for some drives, chipping and putting. But it is the long drive in the fairway — the most important tee off, executed by the driver, without which — all golfers know — everything falls apart. The COAS thus must be selected based on his capability to execute that long straight drive that brings the ball closest to the pin. For if he lacks the professional competence to do that, then like General (retd) Pervez Musharraf, he may execute the wrong drive and thus land the ball not on the fairway but in the rough. The ball must stay on the course. That, in essence, is the responsibility of the COAS. General Ashfaq Kayani kept the army in the fairway and for that he earned the reward and acclaim of all. Never before had an army chief been given an extension of a complete tenure and never before had the purpose of extension been sold to the public as well as the previous government did.

Here we are again — the civilian bosses, all of them, putting their heads together to appoint an army chief. Like always four factors guide them to make the choice: seniority, merit, professional competence and loyalty. Any one factor may stand out when the final decision is made but one thing is certain. Appointing the COAS in Pakistan is never ‘business as usual’ and against all the forecasts and predictions, the civilian bosses may just end up doing what they do best — surprise us all with their final selection. The not so essential but relatively important element that is propelling almost all analysts to seriously consider and make a forecast about the appointment of the next COAS is Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s pre-election statement. Giving an interview to an Indian news channel on May 6, he said, “I don’t think he [General Kayani] will ask for any further extension or he will be interested in any further extension. I will go by the book; I will go by the merit. Whosoever is senior most, will have to occupy … the next one, the next in line”.

Going by the book, the prime minister can technically appoint any general officer regardless of his position ‘in line’. Yet, if merit is the factor by which the prime minister should go, then the line actually does not matter. The ‘next in line’, which in this case is Lieutenant-General Haroon Aslam, is posted as Chief of Logistic Staff — a relatively unimportant post from where traditionally, no officer has ever been elevated to the post of COAS. Had he been the choice candidate of General Kayani, he would not be occupying the post he is currently occupying. Appointments, postings and transfers of general officers are the sole prerogative of the COAS. In their posting and appointments, it is not the seniority of the general officers that is counted but the professional competence to do the job. Thus, a system of merit already runs in the army and the next in line to be promoted is always the chief of general staff (CGS) appointed by nobody else but his boss, the COAS.

The general officer occupying the post of CGS is actually considered army chief’s choice for his replacement on merit. Presently, Lieutenant-General Rashid Mehmood is occupying the post. Ideally, the merit posting of the CGS by the COAS should leave no doubts with the prime minister so as to whom he should appoint as the next chief. But history tells us that the last time Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif made a choice, he did not consider merit as a factor for selection. General Gehangir Karamat had already posted General Ali Kuli Khan as CGS, thus communicating his choice of the next COAS on merit. But the civilian bosses felt that loyalty should be given more value as the determining tool for the selection for the coveted post and so they found General Musharraf and thus selected and promoted him. Who knows, had the choice been made on merit we may be living today to witness a better Pakistan.

But today, if anything, the post 9/11 environment and the complex battlefield it has thrust upon us merits that the military leader selected for the post of COAS must be able to bring about decisive effects. All generals are able and trained to maintain and lead a professional army. But when it comes to fighting internally against an enemy network spread along the length and breadth of our country, we need a military commander who carries a pedigree of routing out militancy. Belonging to Tank, Waziristan Lieutenant-General Tariq Khan, the present Corps Commander of Mangla Corps, to his credit, has the distinction of being the only officer among the aspirants for the coveted post to have led operations as a general officer in the militant strongholds on the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. Swat, Buner, Dir, South Waziristan, Bajur and many other places are all filled with the stories of how the myth of militants in the area was broken and how the army succeeded in establishing control under the leadership of the general. When it comes to experience in fighting the war on terror and understanding the ever-changing military dynamics on our western border, General Tariq seems to be the man.

In the context of civil-military relations, traditionally ‘loss of control over military’ is the fear that guides civilian authority in selecting the man to lead the all-powerful army. ‘Leading from behind’ is the kind of COAS that the civilian authority today wishes and desires. The civilian mindset is clear. It wants an army to implement and execute the national security policy rather than formulate ad design it. With this in mind and the review of our national security high on the civilian agenda merit, yet again, may not be the only factor to select the general officer for the post of COAS.

Lastly, the prime minister would do well to decide and announce the appointment of the COAS. This would put to rest the unnecessary media speculations and also allow the designated chief enough time to make preparations for the long haul ahead. Transition in Afghanistan and the military challenges that this transition may pose on our western border is one of the biggest challenges besides many others that the new chief will face on assumption of his duties.

No matter whom the prime minister appoints as the army chief, he and his batch of civilian advisers may do well to understand that it does not matter who the person that heads our army is but it does matter that the civilian leadership must succeed and provide good governance. Else, matters of national security would continue to propel the army to do what Michael Corleone lamented in The God Father Part III: “Just when I thought I was out, they pulled me back in”.

Published in The Express Tribune, July 30th, 2013.

Like Opinion & Editorial on Facebook, follow @ETOpEd on Twitter to receive all updates on all our daily pieces.

The writer is a retired Lt. Col.

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Gen Haroon Aslam has also lead operations in his capacity as the GOC SSG.

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How I am seeing it , IIn all probability Lt. Gen Haroon Aslam might be appointed CJCSC, The highest of the top brass position but for the most part, a ceremonial one. So That might serve well for NS fears and by making him the Highest Ranked Militray officer he might come out as "going by the book". 

I am not much aware of the profile of Lt. Gen Rashad Mehmood other than the opinion news that he had good relations with Punjab CM while posted as corp commander in Lahore.. But it would be much appropriate if Lt Gen Tariq Khan is given the job, A much more suitable candidate as far as matters of changing asymmetric count insurgency warfare operations and dynamics of post American pull out from AFGH are concerned, Pakistan needs some one like him.

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The above shows the wrong picture.  For the 172nd Sovereign's Parade at RMAS, the Overseas Sword winner was awarded to Cadet Corporal Asad Mushtaq from Pakistan. Asad, 22, was born in Abbottabad.  He attended the Pakistan National University of Science and Technology and then the Pakistan Military Academy, where he was a Cadet Corporal. Whilst at Sandhurst, Asad was in the Academy cricket team and took part in cycling, orienteering swimming and polo. He is to join the 57th Cavalry, his father’s regiment.

 

A picture below:

http://www.army.mod.uk/training_education/24563.aspx

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Pak Gen made adviser on UN peacekeepers
 
August 27, 2013
 

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nation.com.pk
 

UNITED NATIONS -  United Nations secretary general Ban Ki-moon on Monday announced the appointment of Pakistan’s Lieutenant General Maqsood Ahmed as the military adviser for the organisation’s peacekeeping operations.

Lt Gen Maqsood Ahmed, 55, has been a Corps Commander in Pakistan Army. Among his other military appointments, he had served a UN peacekeeping tour of duty in Democratic Republic of Congo in 2005 and 2006. He has replaced Senegal’s Lieutenant General Babacar Gaye, whose tour of duty ended on 8 July 2013.

In a statement, Ban noted that Lt Gen Gaye had played a key role in establishing the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilisation Mission in Mali, the brief observer mission in Syria and deploying the Force Intervention Brigade in Democratic Republic of Congo.

Lieutenant General Gaye is now Mr. Ban’s Special Representative for the Central African Republic and head of the UN Integrated Peace-building Office in that country (BINUCA).

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Far reaching implications if this turns out to be true.  Also if this turns out to be true, then perhaps the next chief of the Army will be Gen Haroon Aslam on the basis of seniority.

 

Too long of a term for Gen. Kiyani in my own opinion, however if it strengthens the JCSC then its a good thing.

 

524ead2b9baf2.gif
Army chief Ashfaq Kayani. — File photo
Updated 2013-10-04 17:00:59

ISLAMABAD: One of Pakistan's most powerful men, General Ashfaq Kayani, is likely to stay head of the military with a new title when he steps down as Army Chief next month, taking over some of the duties of his successor, said government and security sources.

The expected move comes at a time when militant violence is on the rise in Pakistan, while tension boils with India over disputed Kashmir and as Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif seeks to shore up a stable government just months into his job.

For the United States, it would mean continuity in Pakistan's approach ahead of a pullout of most foreign troops in neighbouring Afghanistan at the end of 2014.

There has been speculation over who will take over as chief of the Pakistan army, which has ruled the South Asian nation for more than half of its history since independence in 1947, when Kayani steps down.

Sources and aides close to Kayani said Sharif wanted to make him head of a revamped and more powerful Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee (JCSC).

One senior intelligence official also said that Sharif planned to overhaul the JCSC, a largely ceremonial office, into a “central defence body” by restoring its command over the entire military establishment and giving it additional powers.

“The new JCSC chief will be in charge of the nuclear arsenal. He'll decide on action against terrorists,” said the source, adding that new powers included the right to promote, post and transfer key military officers.

“Basically, the JCSC office will be what it was always supposed to be: the overall boss.”

Sharif has a history of bitter relations with the army but is keen to preserve a semblance of continuity at a time when Pakistan is struggling to contain a growing Taliban insurgency.

However, keeping Kayani in a powerful role is likely to entrench the army once again as the real decision maker in Pakistan, with the civilian government playing second fiddle.

Military officials did not return repeated calls seeking comment. The government's spokesman said he also could not comment until an official announcement on Monday when the current JCSC chief is due to step down.

The devil they know

Kayani's post had already been extended for three years in 2010 — to the discontent of some climbing the ranks below him.

Sources close to Sharif said he was unlikely to give him another extension, which would allow movement in the top ranks.

“The JCSC chairmanship is the most likely option for Kayani,” said a close Sharif aide.

“He's an expert on the Pakistani insurgency. He understands the war in Afghanistan.”

Under Kayani's command, the army has launched several offensives against Al Qaeda and Taliban-linked militants in the tribal regions on the Afghan border. In response, militants have extended their attacks to major cities across Pakistan.

Pakistan is trying to bury the legacy of military rule and this year, for the first time, a civilian government completed its full term and stood aside for Sharif's team to be elected.

Sharif has a difficult relationship with the army, and picking Kayani's successor will be a defining moment of his second term. Kayani was once Intelligence Chief to Pervez Musharraf, the army chief who overthrew Sharif in 1999.

Lieutenant General Rashad Mahmood, Chief of General Staff, has emerged as a possible successor and a Kayani favourite.

Other possible candidates include General Tariq Khan, considered pragmatic on US relations, and Lieutenant General Haroon Aslam, the most senior official after Kayani.

“Nawaz wouldn't want an overly strong army chief and if Kayani plans to stick around in uniform, then he would prefer someone close to him,” a senior retired army officer said. “Rashad is the man.”

Either way, Kayani is widely expected to stay on in one form or another.

“He won't simply retire and disappear quietly,” one Western diplomat in Islamabad said.

The relationship with the Americans is also key.

The US has a long-standing alliance with Pakistan, but ties have been strained by US drone strikes that have also led to many civilian casualties in northwestern Pakistan.

“Kayani has a good rapport with the Americans and has worked closely with them in Afghanistan,” the prime minister's aide said. “For Sharif and the US, it's better the devil they know.”

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“For Sharif and the US, it's better the devil they know.”

 

What kind of an idiotic aide to the PM would say this about his own boss' relations with the country's Army chief? It seems NS and team really have bought into the belief that they do not or cannot have good relations with the Army.

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“For Sharif and the US, it's better the devil they know.”

 

What kind of an idiotic aide to the PM would say this about his own boss' relations with the countries' Army chief? It seems NS and team really have bought into the belief that they do not or cannot have good relations with the Army.

Exactly the kind of idiot that would be a politician in Pakistan.

On a serious matter, is this a good idea? I don't know enough about the subject but surely there are other people equally capable? The state seems to be placing far too much emphasis on the current COAS. Let him move on and allow others to move up too. His extension caused stagnation in the promotion process already. I personally think he's done a good job under very difficult circumstances, continuously visiting troops and by keeping the army out of the politicians games, but he could well do with leaving with the dignity he has gained.

And what are people's thoughts on the creation of this new post? Isn't this what musharaffs was a few years back with a different title?

ndad

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Its always good to bring new people in.  This age old argument about experience is pretty self serving.  The reality is that despite Gen Kiyani being the so-called "expert at CT warfare", the Insurgency has not been defeated nor dented for whatever reasons.  Perhaps some younger officer with newer ideas after having served in insurgency prone areas would be better equipped.

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Exactly the kind of idiot that would be a politician in Pakistan.

On a serious matter, is this a good idea? I don't know enough about the subject but surely there are other people equally capable? The state seems to be placing far too much emphasis on the current COAS. Let him move on and allow others to move up too. His extension caused stagnation in the promotion process already. I personally think he's done a good job under very difficult circumstances, continuously visiting troops and by keeping the army out of the politicians games, but he could well do with leaving with the dignity he has gained.

And what are people's thoughts on the creation of this new post? Isn't this what musharaffs was a few years back with a different title?

ndad

Judging from the number of times inept politicians thrown out of office, the Pakistani Army (or military more broadly) will do what it things as an organization/institution and not because of the thoughts of a single personality. Neither Bhutto (with respect to Zia) and Sharif (on Musharraf) ever thought that the under dogs they picked would overthrow them. Point is, the politicians are idiots for not realizing that unlike the political parties they own which are nothing BUT personality driven, the military is not. At least my hope is not yet, and not ever.

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I reckon: its more to do with the Politicians feeling safe as long as Kyani is around. Since he has not rattled the demoCrazy so far and shows no sign of doing so. In last 5-6 years this country has seen the worst and in all likeliness its going to get even more bad. Any new COAS might not have the patience to see the country slip away into further chaos.

 

Also to note is that, like the rest of the Nation: Army, Navy, Airforce now is also OPENLY involved in corruption and loot.

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