Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Military Operations in FATA IV

502 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

Pakistan Taliban claims cross-border raid

SHALTALO: The Pakistani Taliban claimed responsibility on Friday for a cross-border attack on a security post that appeared to signal the group was adopting a new strategy of large-scale attacks on government and army targets.

In the pre-dawn raid on Wednesday in the village of Shaltalo in Dir region, up to 400 militants crossed from Afghanistan.

More than 24 hours of clashes ensued, the government said.

Twenty-seven Pakistani servicemen were killed and 45 militants died in the clashes in the northwest, security officials said. There were contradictory accounts of casualties and how many militants fought.

“Up to 40 to 50 of our fighters took part in the operation,” Ehsanullah Ahsen, spokesman for the Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan, told Reuters by telephone from an undisclosed location. “None of our fighters were killed.”

The TTP has previously brought fighters from across the porous border with Afghanistan – where it has allies – to attack Pakistani security forces, but none were on the same scale as the Dir operation.

Deputy TTP leader Fakir Mohammed said the group with close ties to al Qaeda had changed strategy and would now focus on large-scale attacks only on state targets like the one in Dir.

“Our new strategy of launching big attacks on military installations was aimed at causing demoralisation in the ranks of the security forces and tiring of the government,” he told a Pakistani newspaper from what he said was a location somewhere in Afghanistan.

Revenge for bin Laden’s death

A new TTP game plan may complicate the army’s efforts to weaken the group, which has stepped up suicide bombings to avenge the killing of Osama bin Laden by US special forces in a Pakistani town on May 2.

Since then, the movement has attacked paramilitary cadets, a naval base, a US consulate convoy and other targets, challenging government assertions that army offensives against militants have succeeded.

After bin Laden’s death, the United States reiterated its call for Pakistan to crack down harder on militants, especially those who cross over to Afghanistan to attack Western forces.

The lawless frontier is home to some of the world’s most dangerous militant groups, who are intricately linked and cross back and forth across fairly easily to carry out operations.

On late Friday night, a remotely piloted US drone aircraft fired three missiles at a militant centre in South Waziristan, one of the seven Pakistani tribal regions along the Afghan border, killing at least five insurgents, local intelligence officials said.

Pakistan’s army will have to contend with a new TTP strategy at a time when it is still reeling from the bin Laden fiasco.

Pakistan, dependent on billions of dollars in aid from its strategic ally Washington, is under more pressure than ever to tackle militancy because of the discovery bin Laden was living close to Islamabad.

As the Dir operation showed, it won’t be easy.

On Friday, helicopter gunships pounded hilltops in assaults on the militants who were still in the area. Soldiers stood near a building pockmarked with large bullet holes from the fighting.

Houses and schools were burnt out.

Most Pakistanis are opposed to the Taliban’s austere interpretation of Islam and its violent methods.

“We also want to limit civilian casualties. Our ultimate objective is to force the government to end its alliance with the United States,” said deputy TTP leader Mohammad.

Rahimullah Yusufzai, an expert on militants, said the fighters involved in the Dir operation had probably fled to Afghanistan to escape government offensives.

Pakistan called on Thursday for stern action against militants in Afghanistan by Afghan and US-led foreign forces to prevent further cross-border operations.

Pakistani Foreign Secretary Salman Bashir conveyed Pakistan’s “strong concern” to the Afghan ambassador to Pakistan.

http://www.dawn.com/2011/06/04/pakistan-taliban-claims-cross-border-raid.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Ilyas Kashmiri ‘killed’ in US drone attack: report

PESHAWAR: According to a BBCUrdu report, Ilyas Kashmiri, a Pakistani terrorist leader with ties to al Qaeda, was among those killed in the latest drone strikes in South Waziristan.

The report quoted locals as saying that Kashmiri was killed in the strike that killed at least nine militants.

Kashmiri was the chief of the Harkatul Jihad al-Islami (HJI), an organisation affiliated with al Qaeda.

He is widely believed to have masterminded the attack on the PNS Mehran naval base in Karachi.

A government official in Peshawar told BBCUrdu that although he had been receiving information regarding the death of Kashmiri in the drone strike, he could not confirm the information.

Moreover, an official in South Waziristan told BBCUrdu that a US drone attack targeted a group of armed militants 20 kilometres from Wana bazaar.

The official said the attack killed nine people and injured three others.

Moreover, the official said that those killed in the attack were believed to be militants from Punjab.

Locals and witnesses told BBCUrdu that Kashmiri had also died in the drone attack.

Witnesses said Kashmiri had arrived in South Waziristan from the Khyber tribal region

http://www.dawn.com/2011/06/04/ilyas-kashmiri-killed-in-us-drone-strike.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Didnt US and friends claim that he was hiding in N Waziristan?

Harkatul Jihad al-Islami confirms Ilyas Kashmiri killed

Agencies

(5 hours ago) Today

This file photo taken on July 11, 2001 shows Mohammad Ilyas Kashmiri, commander-in-chief of the Kashmiri militant group Harkatul Jihad al-Islami, addressing a press conference in Islamabad. — Photo by AFP

ISLAMABAD: A US drone attack that killed nine militants in South Waziristan targeted and killed top al Qaeda commander and chief of the Harkatul Jihad al-Islami (HJI) Ilyas Kashmiri, local officials said Saturday.

Moreover, an HJI spokesman confirmed that Kashmiri had been killed, DawnNews reported.

Kashmiri, 47, was considered one of the most feared operational commanders of the network that Osama bin Laden founded and has been blamed for a string of high-profile attacks on western targets, as well as in India and Pakistan.

The United States had put out a $5 million reward — the maximum for any most-wanted target — for any information that might help locate him.

Pakistani officials said nine militants were killed in the US missile strike on Friday at a compound in the Ghwakhwa area of South Waziristan, a stronghold of al-Qaeda-allied Taliban despite a sweeping Pakistani offensive in 2009.

“Nine militants were killed in last night’s drone strike,” a security official in Peshawar told AFP.

“All those killed were Kashmiri’s fighters but informers told us that the dead bodies were badly mutilated and that it was not possible to recognise any of them,” the official added.

Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani, asked during a visit to the city of Multan about reports of Kashmiri’s killing, said he had “no information”.

Regional and anti-terrorism experts say that Kashmiri was one of al Qaeda’s main operational commanders.

He was blamed for multiple attacks in Pakistan, including the recent May 22 siege on a naval air base in Karachi.

Counter-terrorism officials believe he was the main coordinator of a terror plot targeting Britain, France, Germany and the United States, which was apparently in the early stages when detected by intelligence agencies in 2010.

Two intelligence officials in Wana, the main town of South Waziristan, also confirmed that those killed on Friday were all Kashmiri’s fighters.

http://www.dawn.com/2011/06/04/ilyas-kashmiri-killed-in-us-drone-strike.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Afghan taliban have distanced them selves from from the attack on DIR. They have denied any sort of involvement in this attack on Pak territory.

source: the news

My guess is that the attack was carried out by regular afghan forces with some ttp elements. It could be a continuation of the attack that was carried out by afghan forces some weeks back in the same region of DIR.

I was in malakand agency 2 weeks back (which is right across dir distt) and the no. of low orbit satellites doing recon/spying was unbelievable as they were criss-crossing each other.

To me, your theories are illogical. TTP has admitted that while they initiated the attack, their fellow taliban from afghanistan assisted them. Afghan security forces have also confirmed that people from their side when in Pakistan to attack.

A lot of the attackers wore afghan security forces uniforms. I can understand taliban doing it, i dont see afghan security forces doing it. Attacking in uniform does not allow possibility of denial.

As for satellites, how did you see the satellites ? In any case, the idea that satellites are monitoring north west pakistan is hardly going to get anyone's hearts pounding. Most people have assumed this to be the case for years, even without knowing. So what's the significance ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

To me, your theories are illogical. TTP has admitted that while they initiated the attack, their fellow taliban from afghanistan assisted them. Afghan security forces have also confirmed that people from their side when in Pakistan to attack.

A lot of the attackers wore afghan security forces uniforms. I can understand taliban doing it, i dont see afghan security forces doing it. Attacking in uniform does not allow possibility of denial.

As for satellites, how did you see the satellites ? In any case, the idea that satellites are monitoring north west pakistan is hardly going to get anyone's hearts pounding. Most people have assumed this to be the case for years, even without knowing. So what's the significance ?

Before jumping the gun at least make an effort to read the damn thing more carefully.

The taliban denial was in the paper, it not something that occurred to me in my sleep !

The people who attacked the post had night fighting capability and thats the reason why we suffered such casualties, it is exactly like the attack that happened in april in which again we suffered large casualties. (again thats not something that came to me in my sleep either)

These attacks started after the murder of governor of the province (noristan i think) which is right across the border was killed by taliban and it was blamed on Pak and they wanted revenge. That now is a side issue as other forces have taken control and are using it for their own purposes.

As for the satellites, well in my line of work u do learn a thing or two about them. lakin come to malakand/dir n i can point u in the right direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Before jumping the gun at least make an effort to read the damn thing more carefully.

The taliban denial was in the paper, it not something that occurred to me in my sleep !

The people who attacked the post had night fighting capability and thats the reason why we suffered such casualties, it is exactly like the attack that happened in april in which again we suffered large casualties. (again thats not something that came to me in my sleep either)

These attacks started after the murder of governor of the province (noristan i think) which is right across the border was killed by taliban and it was blamed on Pak and they wanted revenge. That now is a side issue as other forces have taken control and are using it for their own purposes.

As for the satellites, well in my line of work u do learn a thing or two about them. lakin come to malakand/dir n i can point u in the right direction.

Taliban denial is not worth the paper its written on, whether its afghan variety or TTP. I am confident that majority on Pakdef would agree with me on that. Besides, also note that there was a statement from TTP too in which they admitted help from afghan side. I pointed out also that Afghan security forces have also accepted that a cross border attack was carried out by some people from afghan side. None of this is a sign of "revenge attack" by afghan forces, nor will such an attack serve their purpose. At the most, your are indulging in a conspiracy theory.

As for satellites ... I don't know what is your line of work. If you cant say much because your line of work requires confidentiality, then you should not have made the original point because you cant divulge information to answer follow up queries from people like me. If confidentiality is not an issue, then feel free to explain. Asking me to come to malakand (all the way from UK) is a on starter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Awais sahib, electric fences along the entire border is neither achiveable nor should we go for electricuting wild life.

As for Land Mines, no one should EVER support Land Mines even on Indo-Pak border. Over-whelming majority of deaths with them is women, children and livestock in or around border town. It is in-humane and illegal with every international law.

A simple wall would not work either as illustrated by the Naval base experience. Its a tough question and with no answers. United States has been trying all this on its southern border for ever.

but then we have the example of the berlin wall. The point is that we cannot have borders which are free for all to cross as they wish. A state cannot guarantee its security in this way. There are always solutions possible and if we do not find a solution where any crossing only takes place with our premission then we would always have these kind of problems. Remember even before 9/11 we started having problems with taliban, they have not accepted the durand line either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Taliban denial is not worth the paper its written on, whether its afghan variety or TTP. I am confident that majority on Pakdef would agree with me on that. Besides, also note that there was a statement from TTP too in which they admitted help from afghan side. I pointed out also that Afghan security forces have also accepted that a cross border attack was carried out by some people from afghan side. None of this is a sign of "revenge attack" by afghan forces, nor will such an attack serve their purpose. At the most, your are indulging in a conspiracy theory.

As for satellites ... I don't know what is your line of work. If you cant say much because your line of work requires confidentiality, then you should not have made the original point because you cant divulge information to answer follow up queries from people like me. If confidentiality is not an issue, then feel free to explain. Asking me to come to malakand (all the way from UK) is a on starter.

wt i have stated above is a fact and the people at the highest level who matter know about it. U and the likes of u not agreeing does not matter one bit because quite frankly u n the likes of u dont matter (with due respect).

Wt i can only suggest is get ur facts right and if u dig deep enough u might come to know wts really happening.

If u know wt to look for in the night sky (a clear sky being the only pre-requisit) even a ordinary person can pick up the movement of the "stars" and their "flash photography". (if u can even make it to isd even that will suffice)

an nothing secretive about it. it is this secretive "crap" that has got us where we are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

Junaid

You're not making any sense in your ramblings whatsoever. If you cant provide constructive responses to an intellectual debate without going off the wall and talking about stars in the night sky, flash photography or asking some one to go to Malakand when you know thats not feasible then just give it a rest please.

Ibrahim Hayyat your point about the electric fence not being built because it will harm the local wildlife, as commendable as it may be for your care of furry animals but frankly speaking the policy makers don't give a damn. Secondly you have made a good point about landmines except for the fact that the mines will not be scattered but localised on the border facing Afghanistan with clear demarcations. You'd have to be completely retarded to walk into a mine field.

Edited by Sultan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

I agree with sultan. In my previous post i mentioned one thing that people here would agree on as a whole "we are in desperate times" ....and desperate times call for desperate measures. So with that in mind i don't think that we should be complacent as a nation on this issue. WE NEED TO PLUG THE AF/PAK BORDER. Durand line?...what Durand line? .. We as a nation should bring the voice up for this measure to be placed because it is only a logical,practical and sensible thing to do , and no tom dick harry nation or organization or goons like Hamid karzai should tell us what we can or cannot do, when it comes to minding our borders. The only reason i can think of, for uncle SAM and affiliates lobbying against this step, is that it would effectively stop most of the clandestine operations they perform or limiting the capacities of the Indian consulates operating in Afghanistan to support the insurgency in FATA with logistical support and personnel.

It may cost us a fortune, but when you start thinking about the solutions to get out of this humungous load of shyt that we are in, because we cant plug our western border, is that we should effectively build this structure.

but then again..for that to happen we need willingness at the top level..and with the monkeys we have right now in our political office ..this very logical idea seems far fetched.

Here is a rough idea.

post-8639-13647902781.jpg

Edited by Awais_Munawar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I agree with sultan. In my previous post i mentioned one thing that people here would agree on as a whole "we are in desperate times" ....and desperate times call for desperate measures. So with that in mind i don't think that we should be complacent as a nation on this issue. WE NEED TO PLUG THE AF/PAK BORDER. Durand line?...what Durand line? .. We as a nation should bring the voice up for this measure to be placed because it is only a logical,practical and sensible thing to do , and no tom dick harry nation or organization or goons like Hamid karzai should tell us what we can or cannot do, when it comes to minding our borders. The only reason i can think of, for uncle SAM and affiliates lobbying against this step, is that it would effectively stop most of the clandestine operations they perform or limiting the capacities of the Indian consulates operating in Afghanistan to support the insurgency in FATA with logistical support and personnel.

It may cost us a fortune, but when you start thinking about the solutions to get out of this humungous load of shyt that we are in, because we cant plug our western border, is that we should effectively build this structure.

but then again..for that to happen we need willingness at the top level..and with the monkeys we have right now in our political office ..this very logical idea seems far fetched.

Here is a rough idea.

idea is good but why 1000m from Afghanistan why not just few meters to 50 meters max

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

We should have built the fence 5 or 10 years ago when it was really needed. Now with US withdrawal around the corner, the situation will change quite a bit. Anyway, it is still an excellent idea. Afghanistan is not about to straighten out in the near future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

idea is good but why 1000m from Afghanistan why not just few meters to 50 meters max

I think 1000m either side would be good. Treat both as closed military zones. Patrol both sides of the border with mobile vehicles. My only change to awais_munawar's plausible suggestion would be to erect a high barrier (higher the better) and then install coiled barbed wire on either side. Mines may not be necessary in that scenario.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

There should be different types of fences along the border depending on the flow of traffic. At some points where there is known to be heavy active militant crossing the option of mining should be left on the local CO discretion.

The usage of UAV day/night 24/7 will play a vital role for the local CO to see and determine the movement of militants crossing border. Plus GeoSpatial Inet resources should applied to track the movements and predict the future footprints of the militants crossing the border.

Fencing will play a vital role in educating common folks who have been crossing this border for hundreds of years that there is a border and they need to take the responsibility to cross border safely. This type of fencing is called 'herding' to on focal point.

I like Munawar's rough draft and we have start at some point.

Couple of years ago I went with a friend of mine to Quetta. He had a friend who traded goods with Afghans on the western border. We went to Chaman border crossing at 'Baab e Dousti' check point. At 8'clock in the morning the gates at both sides are open. First, I watched with a little shock that the people from Afghanistan crossed into Pakistan without any check of ID. I think close to 5,000 just walked into Pakistan in 25 minutes. Than the people from Pakistan crossed into Spin Boldak Afghanistan without any hinderence, again close to 5,000. When the initial flow of people ended than all hell broke loose with huge 18-wheelers container trucks started moving both ways in dust and misery.

The friend's friend than asked us to climb on top of the one container trucks and gave us a pair of binoculars. To my shock I saw on the Afghan side (Spin Boldak) a check post with the flags of ISAF and Netherlands on mast with Dutch soldiers just causally roaming around not paying any heed to the flow of this traffic.

Least to say on Pakistan's side there is pretty sizable presence of FC which was almost following the ways of their Dutch counter parts daily routine.

The gates are closed at 6 PM every day on both sides.

Pakistanis FC needs to put up to their task because I have a feeling that this attitude is prevalent on all the check posts on the border.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

If u know wt to look for in the night sky (a clear sky being the only pre-requisit) even a ordinary person can pick up the movement of the "stars" and their "flash photography". (if u can even make it to isd even that will suffice)

an nothing secretive about it. it is this secretive "crap" that has got us where we are.

Junaid, these satellites are all over Pakistan (and most of the world). They are just more visible in these areas due to lack of pollution and city lights. When I first visited remote areas of Pakistan on a moonless night, I was shocked to actually see the Milky Way in all its glory. Growing up in cities, one never gets to see it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

If you live in Karachi the best place to look up and see the Milky Way is to drive to Hingol National Park i.e., Sindh side of the Lasbela District.

Complete awe!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Pray tell me where I can get a clear sky with no light pollution, it would be a dream come true (by the way Astro-photography is my serious hobby). In my part of the world, so much light pollution even in remote areas, I cannot see more than a handful of stars. The nearest I got to seeing a clear sky was in Nevada outside of Las Vegas (driving past a town called 'Rachel'), not very far from a famous US base which has lots of folklore around it.

Sorry for the digression.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Farooq,

I have been to Boulder, Denver and Estes park, Co., it is amazing what one can see looking up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Pray tell me where I can get a clear sky with no light pollution, it would be a dream come true (by the way Astro-photography is my serious hobby). In my part of the world, so much light pollution even in remote areas, I cannot see more than a handful of stars. The nearest I got to seeing a clear sky was in Nevada outside of Las Vegas (driving past a town called 'Rachel'), not very far from a famous US base which has lots of folklore around it.

Sorry for the digression.

Mount Pinos, just north of LA in los padres national forest (about 4 hours drive from las vegas ..i think) is one of famous get togather place for a lot of ametuer Astro-physists (big telescope guys) and Astro-Photographers as you can drive all the way up to mountain top parking lot..Just in case if you already don't know. It has very clear sky..

Sorry for being off topic..please continue on

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

This idea of being able to seal the Pak/af border by fencing or mining it, is nothing more than a fools errand conjured about by arm chair warriors who dont even have the slightest of idea of wt they are talking about.

A case in point in us/mexico border:

The us/mexico border is the most heavily guarded border in the world. Its fully fenced and monitored by the very latest servilence equipment in the world 27/7, which includes UAV. The budget of us border petrol alone close to $12 billion.

The geography of the us/mexico border is mostly flat desert terrain, which in theory the us (being the most powerful nation in the world) should be able to control without breaking a sweat.

But the reality is quite oppisite of the theory ie It is the second most frequently crossed international border in the world, with approximately three hundred fifty million (350,000,000) crossings per year. The border is guarded by more than twenty thousand border patrol agents. However they only have "effective control" of less than 700 miles (1,100 km) of the 1,954 miles (3,145 km) of total border, with an ability to actually prevent or stop illegal entries along 129 miles (208 km) of that border. There are an estimated half a million illegal entries into the United States each year.

The Pak/af border:

The border between Afghanistan and Pakistan, which is poorly marked and approximately 2,640 kilometers (1,610 miles) long. It consists of very harsh and rugged terrain.

The northern part of the Afghan-Pakistani border is delineated by the Hindu Kush, a western subrange of the Himalayas that is at its highest elevations in the north. The Hindu Kush feeds into the Himalayas, which are the world’s tallest mountains. Harsh, rugged terrain that is sparsely populated.

South of the Hindu Kush, the Afghan-Pakistani border begins to follow a ridgeline that drops precipitously to the Khyber Pass. The border rises up another ridge south of the Khyber and follows a mountain range known as the Safed Koh, which runs north-south, more or less the orientation of the border for several hundred miles. Though still mountainous, this area is rife with passes and trails. Below South Waziristan, the southernmost agency of the FATA, the border cuts westerly over the Toba Kakar range toward the second vital road link across the border, The border then follows the vast openness of Afghanistan’s Kandahar province, where the terrain is less difficult to traverse.

The responsibility of protecting/guarding the frontier falls on FC, it has an estimated strength of 65000. But the problem is that due to WOT they are bogged down in IS duties all around fata/pata and settled areas. On top of that they are also responsible to counter, smuggling, drug trafficking etc. All this on budget that is shamefully small compared to the job at hand.

This coupled with the fact that most tribes that inhabit fata are also on the afghan side and that the case with most villages as well. People have been moving free across for centuries and any move to curtail this movement will result in complete revolt against the central govt. As already the temp in the area is pretty high.

All in all Pak/af border can not be secured by any one using force. The only way that it can be secured is by gaining trust and through cooperation of the tribes that straddle the border. As long as u dont have their full cooperation their is no chance of securing the pak/af border. the only way we can do that is by changing the status of all the fata and making it into a separate province and integrating the region into Pak. The support for which is wide spread, as the ppl of the region are fed up with their limbo status of neither here nor their.

Edited by JunaidNasir

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Junaid, these satellites are all over Pakistan (and most of the world). They are just more visible in these areas due to lack of pollution and city lights. When I first visited remote areas of Pakistan on a moonless night, I was shocked to actually see the Milky Way in all its glory. Growing up in cities, one never gets to see it.

U need to realize that their are people in the armed forces whos job is to monitor the exact movement and the time of the spy satellites, when their orbit takes them over Pakistan.

Like i said earlier what i told u is from the horses mouth.

Now Sultan if your source of info is limited to the laptop than thats ur bad luck. Just because ur exhibiting ostrich syndrome, certainly does not mean that it not their.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

... more visible in these areas due to lack of pollution and city lights. When I first visited remote areas of Pakistan on a moonless night, I was shocked to actually see the Milky Way in all its glory. Growing up in cities, one never gets to see it.

We forget that there are 3 types of pollution:

1) The regular domestic, industrial or farm refuse,

2) Light pollution, and

3) Noise pollution.

According to psychiatrists, light and noise pollution is no less damaging for our psychological health and well being.

Just imagine not being able to see the show of all the shows; 'Milky Way' at night and rest of the heavens. The city lights create a haze and we can't see the stars and galaxies any more!

By 2030 human population will require about twice the resources that Mother Nature and Planet Earth can provide us! Still ‘moulvis’ (in all disguises) don’t get it and say a word about becoming responsible, living within our means and stop raping Mother Nature!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

@JunaidNasir: Yes my brother, Indeed I am an armchair warrior. But before ridiculing this idea one might think about recognizing the extent of the damage that we would be plugging by taking this "drastic" step. I fully agree with you on the fact that AF/Pak border is the most treacherous terrain to perform this kind of task, with all the hi and lows of the rugged mountains, streams , valleys and virtually inaccessible terrain with extremes of temperature as well. BUT, when i talk of this idea, i don't come out as saying that it is a flip of the fingers and we are all good. I floated and idea that was bothering me in my head for ages now that wot can be the effective solution to stop these cross border activities that is hurting our nation like anything, giving us bad name, causing billions of dollars of damage, spreading chaos and anarchy, and making us fall in the criticism bracket of the so called "international community", that we are NOT doing enough to stop the attacks in Afghanistan from our soil, not to mention the Smugling of goods and ammunition that costs our economy dearly. When u compare "THAT" to the pain we would have to go through to implement this step in some manner on AF/PAK border, only then, it seems that we are left with no choice but this if we want to slow the relentless damage to our nation with this insurgency problem from the western border, along with the logistical support of the Indian consulates to these mercenary groups and clandestine operations from other foreign forces.

I appreciate the members pouring in there input (negative or positive) as long as it is constructive.

If some one in the establishment or the political authorities thinks about this on serious note, then i am positive that we can start to sort out the complexities and hurdles once we make up our minds as a nation that this needs to be done to give us some cushion from all this mess and give our security establishment a break, in a shorter span of time, which seems an impossible task otherwise if we continue with our current policies at the western borders.

One of the members suggested that this type of step is referred to as 'herding', i think it was H Khan. I agree with the term, i mentioned in one of the previous posts that there should be demarcation of populated areas and major passes (Roads etc) along with them on the AF/PAK border. There should be a good number of "pass through" points all along the border from where all the human, vehicle, animal traffic be diverted to the nearest opening which should be guarded effectively by a robust security force with a sole purpose of is to safeguard those openings. Even if the number of such "openings" reaches to 200 to 300 all along the border or even more, even then i am pretty positive that it would cost us less and will save us a major headache in the longer term.

The fence may not be practical for some span of area where the terrain is absolutely merciless. then if that's the case then it would cause major trouble for the elements trying to establish there logistics to support anarchy in Pakistan, thru these fence less areas just because of there sheer ruggedness and extremes. So even if "ALL" the border couldn't be fenced...i guess the establishment would have a pretty good idea by now as to which are the key areas that are used for such activities and which areas can be put on less priority.

There are a million ways to work out a problem, provided the will and understanding for "the need" is there. I would be the first one not to vote for putting the nation through this daunting task "IF" we had a "better", "quick" and "feasible" alternative to help us get rid of this major headache at some level?. If any body has any...please educate me?

The draft i floated was a mere rough idea for some members so that we can get a starting point for the discussion over this by giving a graphical representation of wot was in my head.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Forces retake control of Upper Dir areas from militants

Updated 2 hours ago

[Forces retake control of Upper Dir areas from militants]

UPPER DIR: Pakistani security forces have regained the control of two Upper Dir areas Brawal and Nusrat Darra after the militants from Afghanistan stormed the security check posts and took over the border areas.

In the pre-dawn raid last Wednesday in Dir region, up to 400 militants crossed over from Afghanistan's Kunar province in the raid which have killed 75 militants, 28 personnel and eight civilians.

DIG Malakand Qazi Jameel-ur-Rehman told Geo News that 15 policemen and 12 levies personnel have embraced martyrdom during the clashes.

Search operation was underway in the area and more check posts have been established.

Fighting was concentrated around the Shaltalu police checkpoint, surrounded by mountains and forest about six kilometres (four miles) from the border with Afghanistan's Kunar province.

http://www.thenews.com.pk/NewsDetail.aspx?ID=16592

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

KP asks Karzai to rein in Taliban

Staff Report

PESHAWAR: The Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government has demanded the Afghan president stop Taliban from attacking Upper Dir district while criticising the NATO for ignoring terrorists’ cross over from Afghanistan.

“We have demand President Hamid Karzai to take steps against attacks from Afghanistan by Taliban in Upper Dir district,” said the provincial government’s spokesman Mian Iftikhar Hussain while briefing media on a cabinet meeting chaired by Chief Minister Ameer Haider Hoti. The meeting discussed Wednesday’s cross-border attack launched from the territory of Afghanistan. Khyber Pakhtunkhwa police chief Fayaz Toro briefed the cabinet on the situation in Upper Dir where security forces suffered casualties in clashes with the Afghan Taliban last week.

The provincial cabinet also questioned the NATO’s ability to stop such attacks, according to the government’s spokesman. “The NATO could have stopped these attacks, if it had liked doing so,” he maintained. and said, “We may conclude that the NATO, by not stopping these attacks, was, actually, supporting the Taliban.”

This was the first time when Hussain was seen using strong words against the NATO.

In the attacks, the Taliban torched schools and damaged other infrastructure while overrunning security checkposts and killing over two dozens security officials. The provincial government also demanded the federal government that all Frontier Constabulary officials serving outside the province should be called back to beef up security in the northern districts which are under the threat of further offensives by the Afghan Taliban.

Hussain said that the meeting was of the view that the frontiers should be guarded by the army instead of the Levy. “Police and paramilitary forces cannot guard the borders. The FC is a provincial force and it should not be used by the federal government in Islamabad and Karachi,” said the spokesman, adding that “without wasting any more time, Islamabad should send all FC personnel back to Balochsitan.”

The Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government also expressed anger over the delay in giving teeth to anti-terrorism laws as detained terrorists were freed on bail due to “toothless laws”. “We need strong laws to deal with terrorism.” He said the provincial government would encourage lashkars in Dir and Chitral to check attacks by the Taliban.

http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2011\06\05\story_5-6-2011_pg7_4

10+ years fighting terrorism and we still need time to make laws to deal with the menace??? His own government is a coalition partner in federal Gov. Why havent they put forward any new terrorism bill? The fool has the nerve to suggest setting up another lashkar, when only a few months ago, the previous lashkar created by this government, was "let go off". Not disbanded and dis-armed, no no, they were just taken off Governments payroll. The strategy of arming, organising, training lashkars and then letting them "go", (similar to 1980's) is probably just a little bit counterproductive? dont you think?? With such people in power, this war will last quite some time :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0