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Pakistan’s wounded soldiers fight uphill battle for attention

Published On Fri Jan 28 2011

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Muhammad Yousaf, 29, a Pakistan army casualty, lies in the rehab ward of the military hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. At least 6,710 Pakistani soldiers have been injured in the battle against the Taliban.

Muhammad Yousaf, 29, a Pakistan army casualty, lies in the rehab ward of the military hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. At least 6,710 Pakistani soldiers have been injured in the battle against the Taliban.

Toronto Star/Asim Hafeez

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By Rick Westhead South Asia Bureau

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RAWALPINDI, PAKISTAN—Lt. Muhammad Ali is one of Pakistan’s wounded and forgotten soldiers.

Six years after his left foot was blown off by a land mine in South Waziristan, a remote and mountainous region of Pakistan used as a safe haven by the Taliban, Ali is still battling to get proper care for his injury.

Photos: Pakistan's wounded soldiers

Pakistan is Canada’s ally in the fight against the Taliban, and its beleaguered military is paying a high price. While critics charge that the South Asian country’s fight against religious extremists is half-hearted, the Pakistani army argues that statistics say otherwise. It has lost more soldiers than all of its Western allies combined.

Canada, the U.S. and other coalition force countries have suffered a collective 2,058 soldier deaths; Pakistan’s military has already lost 2,348 soldiers.

The number of wounded Pakistani soldiers is similarly sobering.

In neighbouring Afghanistan, Canadian soldiers face their most dangerous threat from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and anti-personnel mines. The same holds true in Pakistan, where sinister and silent bombs below the ground have been the weapon of choice for Taliban fighters in Swat and South and North Waziristan.

At least 6,710 Pakistani soldiers have been injured in battle, according to government statistics. “IEDs are our biggest problem, so you get an idea how many soldiers we have who need amputations and prosthetics,” said a senior army officer.

Even at a time when the military would seem to control the purse strings of this convulsing country, officers assigned to the Armed Forces Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine (AFIRM) here in Rawalpindi say they are drastically understaffed and underfunded, and are struggling to cope with a growing list of casualties. Amputees like Ali are left languishing.

The 29-year-old, tall and handsome with a touch of grey hair, has already had three amputations on his left leg, because of infection and other problems. He may need another.

The first cut, just above his ankle, came just days after his injury.

The second, months later, was eight inches below his knee. In 2006, Ali had a third amputation in which doctors left him with four inches of leg below the knee. But even now there’s too much loose skin below the sawed-off end of his femur and the skin is easily irritated when he fastens his artificial leg onto his stump.

It’s unclear when Ali will be admitted for another surgery.

The institute is the only hospital of its kind in the country, yet just 20 of 100 beds are reserved for amputees. It can take more than a year for some patients to be admitted.

Even after a soldier secures a bed, it might be months more before a prosthetic is made for him. The institute employs seven technicians who fashion prosthetics out of a mixture of resin, chemicals and engineered parts imported from Germany. At least 40 more technicians are needed to keep up with the demand, staff members say.

The hospital boasts just a single speech therapist, crucial for helping soldiers suffering from brain injuries, and just one occupational therapist, again important for teaching amputees to adjust to their artificial limbs.

“These soldiers have been forgotten by their own government,” said Maj. Omer Jamshed Khan, a doctor at the institute.

While some Canadian soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and other injuries have complained they have been abandoned by their own government, consider that the average Pakistani soldier earns about 20,000 rupees ($231) a month. One patient at the institute suffering from brain trauma after having been shot in the head receives a monthly disability benefit of 1,600 rupees ($18).

Home to the army general headquarters, Rawalpindi is a mere 15-minute drive from Islamabad, yet the facility has never been visited by a Pakistani politician.

“The minister of defence, the interior minister or the health minister? None of them have ever bothered to come,” said one of the institute’s officers, gesturing to the bed of a 31-year-old lance corporal who lost his left leg and badly fractured his right in a January 2009 IED explosion. “This is important. The prime minister himself should be coming here to see these heroes.”

Khan said U.S. army officers have visited twice. “They’ve offered us training and some student-exchange program,” he said, “but that’s not what we need. We need funding. The Pakistan military has to buy bullets, tanks, life jackets.”

A visitor pointed out that the U.S. has pledged to contribute $7.5 billion over five years to Pakistan.

“Yes, it’s funding,” Khan said, “but they do things like count every drop of fuel used by their helicopters here, every bullet shot, everything, and count that as aid to our country. It’s not like they write us a cheque.”

Officers here say they face resistance even within Pakistan’s army.

In the field, military doctors aren’t educated about how to properly amputate a limb.

“We’re still fighting our own doctors,” Khan said. “They need to bevel the bone, not saw it off at a right angle. They need to dissect the nerves so that they are not extending into the scar tissue. If that happens, the soldier will feel pain and discomfort forever, whenever he rubs the stump. And the doctors in the field don’t seem to know that if they have an amputation that’s only a few inches below the knee, that it’s actually better to make the cut above the knee.

“You try to tell them this and their response is, ‘Oh, so now you’re going to teach me about being a doctor?’ ” Khan said. “I remember making a presentation on this and one doctor remarked that Pakistan was still a country with tuberculosis and that rehabilitation of these soldiers was a fancy dream.”

Khan said officers have asked the army to insist that its 150-plus doctors receive training at the Rawalpindi institute, which, in 2009, fitted 67 soldiers with prosthetics, up from 48 in 2008 and just 20 soldiers in 2006.

Ayesha Siddiqa, a strategic analyst who wrote a book on the Pakistan military, said it’s possible that health care is less of a priority within the military nowadays. Pakistan’s economy has been battered in recent months by rising inflation, skyrocketing fuel prices and falling foreign investment. Pakistan has told Western allies that it doesn’t have the troop strength, or the money, to add to its operations against the Taliban.

The Pakistan army was recently forced to scale back its operations in South Waziristan because it was having trouble with the expense associated with helicopter gunships, The Express Tribune, an English newspaper in Pakistan, reported recently in a front-page story.

“I think there’s a sense that they aren’t getting everything they want,” said Siddiqa, who added that the military gobbles up as much as 5 per cent of Pakistan’s expenditures. “That could affect the funding for health care.”

Aftab Hussain, 34, was injured on Nov. 26, 2009 in South Waziristan where, contrary to public perception, the Pakistan army has a presence of some 12,000 troops who carry out “intelligence-based operations,” according to a senior army officer.

Hussain stepped on a land mine as he walked to an outpost.

He wasn’t admitted to the rehabilitation institute in Rawalpindi, however, for more than a year, checking in on Dec. 30, 2010.

“Most of us feel that we’ve done something bad and are being punished,” Hussain said quietly, preparing to eat a lunch of mutton stew and lentils.

Sitting on a blue bench in a doctor’s office, Ali sighed and began to tell his own story.

It was dark and quiet in the pre-dawn hours of Aug. 22, 2004, and Ali’s battalion had an early-morning mission.

Stationed at a base 11,000 feet above sea level, Ali was assigned to leave at 5 a.m. to neutralize a group of Taliban fighters bunkered down in a cave. His commanding officer was confident the enemy would still be sleeping.

“He told me we would meet for tea by 11,” Ali recalled.

There was one kilometre between Ali’s base and the Taliban lair. Ali remembered adjusting his night-vision goggles, checking his AK-47, and running towards the enemy.

He got to within 200 metres when disaster struck.

“I didn’t even feel the landmine underneath me, it just blew me in the air,” Ali said in a measured voice. “When I came to, I looked down and my foot was gone.”

After he emptied the magazine of his machine gun, yelling at his soldiers to attack, Ali blacked out from the pain.

Ali showed a visitor a new, $700 silicone sheath that he slides over his stump, reducing irritation. Ali said the sheath would last for six months before he had to throw it out, and that few soldiers were given the expensive sheaths. Ali had one because priority was given to officers, he explained.

“We need to show the people of our country the price we are paying in this war on terror,” Ali said.

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/930040--pakistan-s-wounded-soldiers-fight-uphill-battle-for-attention

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We should see if we can start a fund for the injured?

This is exactly what I was thinking. I have not heard of this facility before but it would be fantastic to support it... even if we could fund only one extra prosthesis a year it would make an important change in that person and his family's life.

Aziz

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This is exactly what I was thinking. I have not heard of this facility before but it would be fantastic to support it... even if we could fund only one extra prosthesis a year it would make an important change in that person and his family's life.

I don't remember the exact location but its in Lalkurti or surrounding area of rawalpindi.

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this is ****ing poor - how can someone, granted a 'school goer' get so close to what should be a secure site?

Inna lilla he wa inlairajeoon

http://www.thenews.com.pk/NewsDetail.aspx?ID=10904

ndad

Apparently the same training facility was attacked in 2006 as well, killing 20 soldiers, at least according to BBC.

.....A bomb attack on the same centre in 2006 killed at least 20 soldiers.....

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-south-asia-12413469

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Inna lilla he wa inlairajeoon

I am surprised that so many persons could be killed so easy. Not a good pr and certainly not good for people that are doing everything to defend the nation. This should be political corrected. And funds are nice. But the government is responsible for this. The army should investigate how this is possible. It should be funded at state level.

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انا لله وانا اليه راجعون

May Allah give peace to the families of these brave souls

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this is ****ing poor - how can someone, granted a 'school goer' get so close to what should be a secure site?

Well there is a school(IIRC it is called aziz bhatti shaheed college) inside the mardan cantt where the punjab regimental center exists. The school is just inside the gate (outside the gate is the market/bazar). I am not sure about the location of the area where the bombing took place. However, IIRC there is a training ground/assault course which is the on the opposite side of the PRC(but the school is far away from that training ground in terms of walking distance).

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Intelligence gathering must be stepped to prevent future large scale attacks. The enemy is not resting, and its not possible to bomb our way out of it. Even that requires target information. More ressources for ISI and others are needed to combat this evil!

Would-be suicide bomber held: ISPR

Updated at 1620 PST Saturday, February 12, 2011

PESHAWAR: The security forces carried out a search operation on the tip off locals at Gumbat area of Batkhela Malakand agency when a suicide bomber blew up the explosives injuring three soldiers.

According to ISPR, the security forces encircled the bomber who exploded the detonators tied with his body whereas another would be bomber was arrested before he could explode the explosives.

Moreover, five suspected militants have been arrested during the search operation.

The injured soldiers were shifted to the nearby hospital. The security forces cordoned-off the area.(APP)

http://www.thenews.com.pk/NewsDetail.aspx?ID=11042

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I just confirmed it from a cousin of mine( a civilian). The trainee soldiers were inside the center(and not in the training ground on the opposite side of PRC). Aziz Bhatti Shaheed College was near the training facility and this is how that suicide bomber reached the place without arousing suspicion.

PA should start using explosive sniffing dogs on the gates (even on that college gate) if they haven't already.

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Daily Times - Tuesday, February 22, 2011

ANALYSIS: E-mail bomb versus truck bomb —Musa Khan Jalalzai

The cyber war between Pakistan and India is another development in South Asia. In 2008, a group of Indian hackers attacked the website of Pakistan’s ministry of petroleum and natural resources while in December 2010 some 36 websites were hacked by the Indian cyber army

By the end of 2010, a series of events and rapidly developing threats of cyber terrorism across Asia and Europe created an alarming situation. To counter the looming threat of cyber terrorism, many states have decided to make some immediate improvements in their cyber security strategies. Indian cyber attacks against Pakistani state institutions, Pakistan’s cyber attacks against Indian trade and industrial firms, Chinese cyber attacks on both the US and UK government’s computers and the consecutive cyber attacks of Russia and Iran against Baltic, Arab and Central Asian states gives us a dismal message of full-scale modern technological war in the near future. E-mail bombs are considered to be a more effective weapon than the conventional truck bombs, as they can destroy important and sensitive data of any civil or military institution within seconds.

A majority of personal and state-owned computers connected to the internet are vulnerable to infiltration. In 2000, the police department in Japan reported that it had obtained an illicit software programme that could track vehicles. In 2009 and 2010, China attacked the UK foreign office computers 1,000 times.

The recent success of the Pakistan Army in the field of IT and cyber warfare diverted the attention of many states, including the US, UK and Germany towards the creation of a strong cyber command to deal with the challenges emanating from cyberspace. In Pakistan’s Punjab province, efforts are underway to establish a cyber security unit. This decision is part of Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif’s plans to effectively counter Indian cyber attacks against the state institutions. The unit, under the supervision of DIG Malik Khuda Bakhsh Awan, has recently completed its paper work but is still looking for IT experts and cyber analysts.

The recent terror attacks in Pakistan and the vulnerability of its military installations has worried nuclear experts regarding the significant challenges Pakistan is facing. Terrorist organisations and other extremist groups want to recruit IT experts in the field of nuclear and cyber attacks. Any rival state or firm can provide them their members trained in making such attacks. Terrorism has already been a grave threat to state institutions in the country; this will just add fuel to the fire.

The cyber war between Pakistan and India is another development in South Asia. In 2008, a group of Indian hackers attacked the website of Pakistan’s ministry of petroleum and natural resources while in December 2010 some 36 websites were hacked by the Indian cyber army. These websites included the websites of Pakistan Navy, the National Accountability Bureau (NAB), the ministries of foreign affairs, education and finance, as well as NADRA and the Council of Islamic Ideology, which were badly disrupted. According to the country’s cyber Ordinance, “Whoever commits the offence of cyber terrorism and causes death of any person shall be punishable with death or imprisonment for life.” The ordinance also sets out punishments for electronic fraud, electronic forgery, system damage and unauthorised encryption. Most experts worry about the weak counter-measures of the country and complain about the ineffectiveness of the Prevention of Electronic Crimes Ordinance, introduced in February 2009.

However, the governments of UK and Australia have recently announced a partnership to meet the challenges of cyberspace. The WikiLeaks’ recent exposure, attacks on various websites and data infringement incidents stress the need for strengthening cyber security.

Here in Britain, defence researchers are of the opinion that the data of military industry and other departments is under threat. The recently announced National Security Strategy of the country depicts a frightening picture of the future cyber terror threat. Prime Minister David Cameron said, “It is the UK defence need.” Today, citizens of Britain are facing the worst form of cyber terrorism. Cyber warriors electronically attack institutions. It is a much cheaper method and the culprits are almost impossible to track down.

The cyber war between Iran and the Arab world is another interesting story. Iranian hackers have been trying to retrieve sensitive data from the computers of state institutions of various Arab states since long. To destroy the Iranian nuclear programme, Israel transmits strong viruses to the computers of Iranian nuclear installations. Russia attacked the state computers of Estonia and Georgia in 2007 and destroyed all important defence and infrastructure related data. Attacks on the military industry, infrastructure, communications, police networks and financial markets pose a rapidly growing but little understood threat to the security of a state. Information warfare among the states of Asia and Europe and between China, the UK and US can further disrupt the economic cycle of the world economy.

This will become a weapon of choice in future conflicts. Cyber warriors use different viruses to disable and meddle with the military data of other countries. After the development of cyber weapons in Asia and Europe, experts say the days of foot soldiers will be numbered. The use of computer viruses as weapons against rival states has now become a tradition in the modern world. General David Richard has recently hinted about the establishment of a Cyber Command to protect the country from online strikes and launch its own attacks. In October 2010, the UK defence ministry debated the emergence of the internet in modern warfare in its Strategic Defence and Security Review. Defence and other departments in the UK and US are feeling a strong threat from Chinese, Russian and Indian cyber warriors. Moreover, the People’s Liberation Army, Russian Army and other advanced states mostly depend on electronic warfare. The Chinese military establishment has adopted a formal strategy called Integrated Network Electronic Warfare.

The writer is author of Britain’s National Security Challenges and can be reached at zai.musakhan222@gmail.com

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Mashallah this is the type of program needed to get these former militants back into society.

WS

Suleman

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Personally, I am of the view that there should be a law by which this breed of people ought to be dropped from 25000 ft into Arabian sea. But since that does not exist, I'd say this is a very brave effort by the Army. These people have committed awful atrocities against their own countrymen. Other countries with far more financial resources have run more elaborate schemes of this nature and even those have only achieved partial result i.e a certain percentage goes straight back to terror. Its safe to say that a bigger percentage from this lot will go straight back to terror.

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I don't know if members took note but a new variant of the G3 was displayed at IDEX by POF - G3S. With an UBGL, Sights, retractable butt stock it looks like a decent bit of kit. It'll be interesting to see if the PA decides to induct this new rifle and maybe one day even issue them as standard to replace older versions.

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I don't know if members took note but a new variant of the G3 was displayed at IDEX by POF - G3S. With an UBGL, Sights, retractable butt stock it looks like a decent bit of kit. It'll be interesting to see if the PA decides to induct this new rifle and maybe one day even issue them as standard to replace older versions.

any images?

ndad

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Asalamo-a-laikum.

That carbine is MILES too front heavy. It is completely unbalanced. They should have 'bullpupped' the G-3/PK-8, (which they are perfectly capable of doing at POF), and then stuck all that extra stuff on it. Pretty much ALL the weight is concentrated quite far ahead of the grip. It'd be highly fatiguing for a soldier to carry.

The PA does need a shorter frontline weapon, but I don't think carbine is the way to go. A bullpup assault rifle would shorten and lighten a design without compromising on performance. It would remain balanced, and would be easier for soldiers carrying it to enter and exit wheeled/tracked APCs and helicopters whilst carrying it.

I'm glad POF are moving down the road of looking at night sights and an UBGL, but they have a long way to go yet before they get it right.

That isn't it.

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I dont think you can make that statement confidently without having physically handled that rifle down range Zia.

Also bullpup isn't the ideal config and modifying the PK8 to take on such a config is more hastle than its worth. Why not just buy off the shelf steyr augs a tried and tested weapon? Out of all the bullpup config out there none bar the steyr and tavor have seen export success. Says a lot when comparing it standard config rifles in trials. I think the G3S is a major step forward in producing newly configured rifles based on tested technologies and is the most cost effective solution for the jawan on the field.

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Asalmao-a-laikum.

Sultan,

You have a point, but if you've handled a G-3, then you start to get an idea of the balance of the G-3S when you take into account the UBGL on display at IDEAS2008 was "about 1kg" by their own admission, and that was unloaded.

So taking into account a collapsible stock which has shifted the centre of gravity forward, the sight which shifts it forward even further, the mag (perhaps another one taped to it, the UBGL, and then the grenade itself, everything is forcing the centre of gravity forwards and ensuring it takes far more effort to keep it level, hence it contributes significantly to fatigue. Fatigue as we know leads to mistakes.

I'm not sure the bullpup PK8 is more hassle than its worth for the above mentioned reasons (vehicle entry exit, balance once you start fitting all manner of things to it etc). I think it's ideal. The PA is dragging its feet over replacing its battle rifle due to cost. In the meantime we use a wider range of assault rifles with different calibres than we should be doing. We need to standardise more.

A bullpup G-3 has been done:

http://www.diomil.ir/images/product/Original/aig/assault1g3.jpg

http://www.diomil.ir/images/Product/aig/Specifications/assault1g.jpg

It's not hard, and the above was only a prototype to prove it could be done. It's still based on tested technologies. That is why it should appeal to Pakistan.

As for export success, even the SA-80 is in service with Jamaica. It wasn't an export success as such because the British dragged their feet on fixing its faults. The L-85A2 which was developed from it and is in service with the British Army now is pretty much fault free. It's just missed the export boat. The Steyr AUG and Tavor are just the most famous. Others that have seen export success are: QBZ95, SAR21, FN F2000 (which the PAF SSW use), even the FAMAS. So they've pretty much all been successfully exported.

They have their faults of course, but they are overcome by their benefits. As for the Steyr AUG though, I know it's in service with the PN Marines, but considering it has a habit of loosening off rounds, and is pretty 'fiddly' when it comes to being stripped, I think it better for the PA to stick with G-3, but only a bullpup variant. There'd be a minimum of disruption in terms of training and logisitcs. One thing they would need to change is to modify it to accept a STANAG/M-16 mag like all other NATO 5.56mm rifles, if that is the calibre the PA wants to go for.

Calibre is another topic however. This is just the rifle.

PS: For a comparison of bullpup variant of the SLR with the Steyr AUG: http://www.nvtech.com.au/index-pastProjects.html

Edited by zia ul haq
Addition

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http://www.soldiermod.com/volume-6/pakistan.html

The Pakistan Army has been traditionally trained to fight a conventional war which has emphasised the skills necessary to effectively conduct operations in any state-on-state conflict, characterised with force-on-force engagement. Though a low intensity conflict doctrine has existed this has evolved significantly in recent years.

The Pakistan Army is conducting full fledged counter insurgency operations in Swat and South Waziristan in Swat and other tribal areas employing infantry, armour, artillery, aviation assets and Special Forces.

“While we have learnt the value of small unit tactical operations, we have also developed an appreciation of critical enablers in hardware without which even the best trained troops would be hamstrung in optimizing their combat efficiency,” stated Lt Gen. Muzammil Hussain, Inspector General Training and Evaluation (IGT&E), GHQ speaking prior to his appointment to this role at IQPC's Soldier Transformation APAC 2010. “Enhanced lethality, increased mobility, improved communications, and battle space domination are general objectives of our force modernization efforts.”

For the dismounted soldier, recent operations have emphasised the need for improved surveillance equipment, protective gear, small arms, and communications equipment. Gen. Hussain commented, “A sure recipe for success in Low Intensity Operations is reliance on individual initiative, timely dissemination of intelligence, efficient communication, lightly armed troops packing lethal fire effects.”

In addition to new procurement, operational demands have seen a shake-up in training procedures with different Training Modules placing special emphasis on subunit and group level with the Organization of Small Combat Teams / Quick Reaction Forces.

Gen. Hussain emphasised the importance of core infantry skills, “This changed scenario and threat spectrum led to formulation of a new training regime based on refined individual responses. Hidden enemy seldom offer opportunities to be targeted. Hence high standards of training are essential to engage and destroy targets when appeared with personal weapon/supporting fire.”

The changes have also seen the introduction of new training aids and simulators like the new Infantry Reaction Course, Stress Course Fire Ranges and Static Pop Up Target Systems.

Near term procurement had resulted in the Introduction of the latest communications including Motorola sets, surveillance systems, FM Transmitters and Global Positioning System. Doctrinal and organisational changes has seen the organisation of Air Control Teams at the lowest Level.

In term of lethality new Automatic Grenade Launchers have been introduced to offer a standoff capability. This is also being matched to mobility platforms. Gen. Hussain stated, “We are endeavouring to mount this system on a lightly armoured transport vehicle to provide mobile firepower to our infantry.”

Future Soldier

While near term capability enhancements are the current priority, thinking has moved over to what Pakistan's soldier modernisation programme might look like with planning for Pakistan's SMP being in its initial phases.

Improvement to lethality figures strongly in Pakistan's thinking which will see the replacement of the 7.62mm H&K G3 with light caliber assault rifle with various attachments and add-on features such as under barrel grenade launcher, holographic sights and multi-function laser pointer/target designator. To this will be added Non Lethal Weapons to better cater for the requirement of Operations Other Than War, Gen. Hussain stated that NLWs are currently being evaluated from the international market. Modern portable Anti tank weapon systems are being assessed.

Unusually on the requirements side, Pakistan is seeking a new flamethrower. Pakistan's current equipment is seen as being of an “old vintage” and the military is currently “evaluating latest standards of Flame Throwers with enhanced capacity of fuel and range.” Battle field Identification Friend or Foe for vehicles and dismounted infantry soldier systems available on the international market are now being examined.

In communications terms a “Personal Net Digital Radio” is required with integrated GPS and with the, “capability to be linked with a PDA (Personal Data Assistant) at second in command level.” A low level Multi-band inter/intra team radio with ground to air transmission facility is also required.

This will be supplemented by an Individual Soldier's Computer Communication. Which is described as being smart enough to display information and provide position/navigation data. Soldiers will be able to view information through a hand held colour display or through an integrated head gear subsystem display.

Pakistan has a requirement for an Infantry Battle Field Command and Information System. This will integrate infantry soldiers' communication with other arms especially with air assets and permit unit command posts to exchange data from battalion level down to infantry platoon and section levels as well as to higher Headquarters.

In term of personal protective equipment, a Light weight helmet compatible with NBC masks and night vision is being pursued with integrated headgear for a ballistic protective helmet shell, light weight garments, lightweight anti-mine combat shoes and body armour with integrated elbow and knee protection being some of them.

Gen. Hussain stated that Pakistan is currently evaluating modern lightly armoured and air transportable vehicles from the international market which can perform the role of “Mother Ship” for Infantry sections or teams by enhancing the Infantry man's mobility under armour protection.

In terms of Night Vision Gen. Hussain stated, “Our area of focus is on Image intensification sights and thermal sights for Small Arms and Light Anti Tank weapons, Hand held image intensification scopes and Night Vision Goggles for commanders and operators of crew served weapons/drivers and Light weight observation kit for mortar fire controllers.”

He continued that there is a “dire need” for Night Vision Devices which is being felt during cordon and search operations suggesting this is the near term priority.

In terms of night vision requirements Pakistan sees these as; light in weight, water proof, small in size, user friendly and having functional controls like polarity, brightness, gain, recital movement and focusing. The systems should also have auxiliary Infra Red illumination facility for map reading and multi-functions like night driving, patrols, combat action and security duties should be able to fix an array of weapon systems manufactured by the Pakistan Ordnance Factory. n

Gen. Hussain was speaking at IQPC's Soldier Transformation APC 2010

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Excellent find airbus!! That report pretty much is a blue print on how our future soldiers are going to be equipped and the level of their operational capabilities as a result of these new hardwares. Mobility and firepower in a net centric environment will give the PA the upperhand everytime. Glad to see the brass thinking small before thinking big.

Zia the PA is not going to induct a bullpup. Trust me.

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