Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Unsolved Historical Facts

26 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

view: A criminal conspiracy —Ijaz Ul Haq Part 1

Ten months after the crash, an FBI team arrived, comprising only three members and without any assistance from an air-accident or forensic expert. The team only recorded verbal statements of a few concerned individuals without any worthwhile effort to conduct a detailed investigation

21 years ago, on August 17, a Pakistan Air Force C-130, an aircraft known for its established safety and reliability records, crashed near Bahawalpur. Through the process of elimination, it was established by the Board of Inquiry that the cause of the crash was, without doubt, sabotage.

In addition to 29 martyrs from the military, two US nationals were also killed: US Ambassador to Pakistan Arnold Raphel and Brigadier-General Herbert Wassom. Pakistan’s top military hierarchy was eliminated.

The mystery was that the Vice Chief of the Army Staff General Aslam Beg, having himself hovered over the crash site, preferred to fly back to Rawalpindi. Major General Mehmud Durrani, the host of the entire episode, moved to Multan for a comfortable sleep.

Now claiming credit for democracy and decorated with a Democracy Medal, then General Beg did not feel obliged to care for his fallen comrades. Without inquiring about the survivors, and with the urge to take over, he rushed to Rawalpindi where in a high level meeting, he faced stiff resistance from powerful personalities.

The mortal remains were shifted to CMH Multan. Doctors performed a post-mortem on Brig-Gen Wassom, which revealed that he had died before the plane hit the ground. Doctors were stopped from conducting post-mortems on the rest of the victims. If done, it could have determined their cause of death. The Board of Inquiry had confirmed the presence of sulphur, antimony and other lethal chemical agents in the wreckage. It is also suspected that odourless poisonous gases were leaked inside the cockpit, rendering the crew unconscious or paralysed. This is why, it is deduced, no mayday signals were received at the control tower.

US law requires mandatory FBI investigation into the killing of any US national in any part of the world. In this case, when an FBI team was about to leave for Pakistan, mysteriously, it was stopped by the US secretary of state. It was also surprising that the team that had already arrived to assist in the investigation had done so without any formal request by the government of Pakistan.

Ten months after the crash, an FBI team arrived, comprising only three members and without any assistance from an air-accident or forensic expert. The team only recorded verbal statements of a few concerned individuals without any worthwhile effort to conduct a detailed investigation.

By then, the Pakistan People’s Party had come to power and it was futile to expect any cooperation from its government. Colonel Ghulam Sarwar Cheema (retd), minister of state for defence, in response to a question about the outcome, said that anyone interested in the outcome of the investigations should make a direct telephone call to Allah, who alone can reveal the outcome of the investigations. This was the callous attitude of the government functionaries responsible for conducting the investigations!

The FBI team that had arrived as mentioned above was found to be without any explicit mandate by either the government of the United States or Pakistan. It was handed over a list of 25 individuals who should have been questioned/interrogated for their possible involvement in the conspiracy. No one on that list was confronted. After a trip to Taxila and Murree, the team left at its leisure.

In 1979, Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, in one of his writings, had threatened that “if I am assassinated, my sons will take revenge”. Even before his execution, his sons and siblings had formed a terrorist group — Al Zulfikar — which carried out a series of terrorist attacks in the country. Die-hard political workers and estranged youth were recruited by Al Zulfikar and taken to India, Afghanistan, Libya and Syria for terrorist training. One such draft, on its way to Indian shores, was arrested by the Pakistan Navy.

Al Zulfikar gained strength and capabilities, and effectively joined hands with the enemies of Pakistan — RAW, Mossad, the KGB, Afghan intelligence, and any other outfit willing and working to weaken Pakistan.

It fired a missile on the then president’s aircraft at Rawalpindi, which missed the target. Another aircraft, a PIA airliner, was hijacked and taken to Damascus via Kabul. From the flight manifest, Murtaza Bhutto singled out Major Tariq Rahim, had him killed and threw his body on the tarmac at Kabul airport. This ill-fated young officer was the son of a retired general and served as ADC to Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, Murtaza’s father. While travelling together in a car, Chaudhry Zahoor Elahi and Justice Molvi Mushtaq were ambushed in Lahore. Justice Mushtaq was the Chief Justice of the Lahore High Court, had presided over the trial of Mr Bhutto and awarded him the death sentence. In the attack, Chaudhry Zahoor Elahi was killed, while Justice Mushtaq suffered serious injuries.

Soon after the destruction of Pak 1, Murtaza Bhutto claimed that his organisation was responsible for the crime, but retracted his claim when he came to know about the killing of US citizens. Similarly, an earlier caller to a local newspaper, hours before the crash, wanted to know if the president’s plane had crashed or not. A credible story is that the plane was hit with a missile, causing inward impact and damaging its cargo door.

The criminal act had been executed with completely sophistication and accuracy to ensure that the target was achieved through multi-layered employment and execution.

General Zia-ul Haq lived and died for Islam. Having defeated and disintegrated the Soviet Union, he was dreaming of an Islamic renaissance and of transforming the Muslim world into a united ummah. This could have caused alarm in those opposed to this idea. The plant at Kahuta, still in its infancy, needed to be fertilised with bloody; for his patriotism, commitment and aspirations, General Zia-ul Haq was a willing donor. Pakistan under him could not be deterred from pursuing the nuclear path. The Soviet Union, through its Friendship and Defence Treaty with India, had broken Pakistan in two. Zia-ul Haq paid the Soviets back in the same coin, and was determined to pay back the Indians.

The Soviets had resolved to punish Pakistan for the defeat it had suffered in Afghanistan. Pakistan under Mr Bhutto during his last days in office was about to be annexed into the Soviet bloc. There was a strong nexus with Syria, Libya and Palestinian leaders, who were trying to woo Pakistan towards the Soviet Union. This game plan was reversed under General Zia-ul Haq. That could not have pleased the Soviets, given their status as a global hegemonic power.

Rajiv Gandhi had threatened Pakistan that it should stop interfering in the Khalistan movement or else it will repent for generations. Israel also could not remain aloof and unconcerned from the emerging threat of Islamic revival.

The relevant quarters, interested and anguished, could not just sit back in this fast changing global scenario. John H Dean, a Jew and then US Ambassador to India, testified to Israel’s involvement in the crash. He was later declared insane and sent to Switzerland for recovery and recuperation. Israel’s involvement, by logic, means American consent and Indian connivance and collaboration.

An interesting yet mysterious fact about Mr Dean is that he suspects Israeli agents may have also been involved in the C-130 crash. That probably led to a decision in Washington to declare him mentally unfit, forcing his resignation from the Foreign Service after a 30-year career. Later he was rehabilitated by the State Department, given a distinguished service medal and the insanity charge was confirmed to be phoney by a former head of the department’s medical service.

Various commissions were formed by the government to investigate the disaster without pinpointing the criminals who had destabilised Pakistan via sabotage — under FK Bandiyal, Chaudhry Shujaat, and later Justice Shafiur Rehman. No discreet inquiry or criminal investigations were ordered by the then COAS, who instead was fast enough to cover up the tragedy and not preserve the evidence. Justice Shafiur Rehman himself mentioned to me that the debris of the ill-fated C-130 had been removed and disposed of, thus denying any examination.

General Zia-ul Haq was a human, and all humans have friends and foes; and some friends-turned-foes. Carrying and concealing his knife, through centuries, Brutus is always in attendance in the court of Caesar. What services, for example, rendered endeared Major General Mehmud Durrani to Benazir Bhutto to the extent that even after her death, he could not be left unrewarded and was made the National Security Advisor?

This is the first article in a two-part series. The concluding article will appear tomorrow. The writer is a former federal minister for religious affairs

Home | Editorial

Part 2

view: Punish the Bahawalpur conspirators —Ijaz Ul Haq

On behalf of all those millions, I demand that the government of the day bring to book the enemies of Pakistan who by their act of subversion and sabotage executed the Bahawalpur conspiracy. By targeting Zia-ul Haq, they targeted the soul and spirit of Pakistan

It was a conspiracy. And it was an International conspiracy too. But it could not have been carried out in practical terms without active and acquired assistance from local sources. The crime could not have been committed without the cooperative involvement of local hands.

A young officer of the Pakistan Air Force, Pilot Officer Akram Awan, arrested May 1988, was under investigation by the ISI for being an agent of RAW and Mossad. This officer was working in collaboration with enemy agencies to plan and execute an air strike on the Kahuta Nuclear Plant. He was arrested a few months before the C-130 crash and was in perfect incommunicado custody. He had not known any thing about the Bahawalpur crash.

Awan was shown footage of the C-130 crash. When he came to know that among those killed with General Zia-ul Haq was Maj-Gen MH Awan, he suffered an emotional breakdown and started crying. It is mentioned that General Awan had helped Akram Awan in his education and career. He had thus developed a deep emotional attachment. Experts confirmed that this reaction was instant, genuine, natural and unfeigned. In this instant reaction, he uttered, “Sir, I never knew these *******s would do it.”

Akram Awan stated that he had been handed over some matchbox-like device of chemical material by a Mossad operative in New Delhi to be delivered to Air Martial Agha Zulfiqar Ali Khan (retd) in Pakistan. The device once placed in the cockpit would render the crew incapacitated in less than 25 seconds. He deposed that meetings took place at the residence of the said retired air marshal and were attended by an Indian envoy, a US Army colonel and a Mossad agent who had travelled to Pakistan on an American passport.

Photographic and video evidence, along with other confessional material, was handed over by the ISI to General Aslam Beg. Akram Awan was eventually imprisoned and is currently serving his jail sentence. However, the case with solid leads is pending. Where are these case files now? When the person involved is alive and available, why can’t investigations be carried out? Why the retired air marshal not questioned is a mystery. Instead he was allowed total access to the intelligence agencies to further destroy the evidence.

The event scheduled at Bahawalpur did not require presidential participation. Munitions pieces are put to test and trial before induction into the armed forces. Why was the VCOAS so keen to have the president present at this particular point in time and location? Why did Gen Mehmud Durrani insist so much, almost prevailing on the president to attend the event? Why and who persuaded the Chairman JCSC to join the presidential entourage? Why were doctors not allowed to carry out post-mortems on the dead bodies? Why were those with an inkling about the details of the incident transferred to far off places? Why was a military inquiry not ordered?

The then VCOAS insists that an inquiry was ordered and conducted. If so, where are the findings and results of said inquiry? What are the results of the Punjab Police investigation?

Who benefited the most is the fundamental lead to any commission of crime. Those who killed Zia-ul Haq could have done so at any time much earlier. Why was this moment selected to eliminate him? Had the dismissed government of Mr Junejo been in place, none could have gained by this crime. Both the ISI and the IB had informed in advance of a possible threat to the president and the president was cautious enough not to have left Rawalpindi after May 29, 2009, i.e. after the dismissal of the Junejo government. Our frequent approaching the Americans in connection with the investigations irked them to the extent that they blatantly told us that if we have to play any positive role in the service of our country, then we would have to bear with this personal loss. These and other such countless questions remain yet un-answered.

Disappointed, we contacted a well-known American law firm F Lee Bailey for legal assistance. They opined that if we sue Lockheed Inc, the manufacturer of the C-130 aircraft, the onus would be upon them to prove that the crash was not due to any mechanical failure or any such technical reasons. This in turn would strengthen our plea that this was a conspiracy and an act of subversion, sabotage and terrorism. The lawyers were thrilled and exclaimed that they have got the case of the century. They informed me that the head of Civil Aviation in the US had invited him to lunch for a discussion on the issue. But having met the said gentleman, he expressed his inability to further pursue the case for unexplained reasons. Another mystery.

Throughout her life, Ms Benazir Bhutto had been talking of a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to uncover and examine our national history. I agree and echo that demand. The Commission should examine and investigate national disasters, like the deaths in misery of the Quaid-e-Azam and Madar-e-Millat, the murder of Liaquat Ali Khan and the Rawalpindi Conspiracy, the secession of East Pakistan, Ojhri Camp, the Bahawalpur conspiracy, the Kargil Crisis, Lal Masjid and the killings of Akbar Bugti and Benazir Bhutto.

It is strange that Mr Zardari has claimed that he knows the killers of his wife, and yet millions of dollars are being spent from the state exchequer to take her case to the United Nations. Similarly President Pervez Musharraf is alive and kicking, enjoying the luxuries of life in London; while some of those that tried to assassinate him have been sentenced to various punishments, with at least one executed. Interestingly, he himself would not know the exact number of his killers and the names of cities/towns and the types of courts where those accused of his murder are being tried. Similarly in the case of the attempted assassination of Mr Shaukat Aziz, the alleged murderers have been tried and stand convicted. Conversely, not a single individual involved in the case of the Shuhada-e Bahawalur or other such incidents has been caught.

I had much earlier warned that if the murder of the top military hierarchy is not investigated and its planners and perpetrators not accounted for, such and similar incidents would continue recur. It has since happened in the case of Benazir Bhutto while Pervez Musharraf and Shaukat Aziz had narrow escape.

In my own capacity, I would not wish to point an accusing finger in any direction. It is for the government (which otherwise keeps contemplating the re-opening of the court case after which ZA Bhutto was executed) to fulfil its obligations by investigating this national loss and the broad daylight murder of so many senior military leaders.

Being the son of Shaheed General Zia-ul Haq, I am proud that he died with his boots on, in full military fatigue and in the performance of his duty to the country.

I alone do not represent his legacy. There are millions in the country and outside who stand by his ideals, achievements, services and sacrifice. They admire and adore him. He died a hero’s death. His funeral was unprecedented, with millions of his fellow countrymen from every stratum of society paying homage and mourning the loss of their hero.

On behalf of all those millions, I demand that the government of the day bring to book the enemies of Pakistan who by their act of subversion and sabotage executed the Bahawalpur conspiracy. By targeting Zia-ul Haq, they targeted the soul and spirit of Pakistan.

He was a dictator. Yes, I concede that he was a dictator. But dictionary meanings apart, it is the mentality of a person that defines him. Anyone can be a Dictator. A down to earth democrat can turn into the worst dictator. We have already experienced this in Pakistan. People knew that General Zia-ul Haq was a dictator; but they also knew that he was a benign dictator. He ruled not only Pakistanis but also their hearts and minds. He worked very hard for the betterment of his people. And ever since his departure, the country has been in a constant state crisis.

This is the concluding article in a two-part series. The first article appeared yesterday. The writer is a former federal minister of religious affairs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Zia was killed as part of a huge conspiracy to eliminate any one who had any knowledge of a shocking illegal covert activity. Leak or publication of information regarding this activity could have resulted in heads being rolled at the highest level in certain world capitals. Other victims of this conspiracy included a Governer of the NWFP, a very senior Shia cleric and an international Bank. I'll leave the rest to your imagination. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Boota, we are trying to get the historical facts right and you throw a 'kasuti' :D with all the masala of conspiracy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Zia was killed as part of a huge conspiracy to eliminate any one who had any knowledge of a shocking illegal covert activity. Leak or publication of information regarding this activity could have resulted in heads being rolled at the highest level in certain world capitals. Other victims of this conspiracy included a Governer of the NWFP, a very senior Shia cleric and an international Bank. I'll leave the rest to your imagination. ;)

Governer = Fazl-e-Haq

Shia Cleric = Arif-ul-Hussaini

Bank = BCCI

Do a Google search on Fazl-e-Haq to learn more ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Governer = Fazl-e-Haq

Shia Cleric = Arif-ul-Hussaini

Bank = BCCI

Do a Google search on Fazl-e-Haq to learn more ....

Oh I'm sorry if my post has no relevance to this thread. What about Great Mufti Mehmood-- father of Great Fazal Rehman? My father long ago told me first hand story about him. My father was educationist when he was Chief Minister of the province. Ones he was presiding the meeting of educationists and my father was present there in meeting. There was some guest from Lahore who was dressed in pant shirt rather than traditional shalwar kameez and that guest was made highly humiliated by Mufti Mehmood that he was made to leave the meeting because of his English dressing.

Mullah's Ethics...:mad::mad:. I'm really fed up to read such dirty characters so called upholders of Islam in History of Pakistan.

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Boota, we are trying to get the historical facts right and you throw a 'kasuti' :D with all the masala of conspiracy

We can talk about it next time we meet including the back to back letters of credit for infrared seekers.:D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Governer = Fazl-e-Haq

Shia Cleric = Arif-ul-Hussaini

Bank = BCCI

Do a Google search on Fazl-e-Haq to learn more ....

Zia took part in his funeral. How could a dead man, be a part of this conspiracy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Zia took part in his funeral. How could a dead man, be a part of this conspiracy?

Read my post. I did not place the blame or responsibility on anyone listed above. They were all victims. The process of elimination took years but every one connected with the activity was ultimately taken out. If I keep writing on this topic it is possible that this forum might loose me as a member.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

lol. Boota Sb is using highly coded language in his post which only Historians can decode not history rookies. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Well there are a lot of conspiracy theories about death of Zia .. the famous ones are

a) Heroin trade financing for afghan war and than subsequently CIA removed all assets involved in it

B) Stinger missile sale commission disputes and subsequent revenge killing within the cartel

c) Revenge Killing by Al –Zulfiqar using Mossad

But for me, it is a 500 year old black magic spell on land of Indus valley and northern part of Indian subcontinent casted by an evil witch that killed Zia. This spell forces new king to be crowned only after death of previous king and forces previous king to love his throne more than his life.

Muhammad Khan Junejo was super human when he overcome this evil spell and actually killed the evil witch by sacrificing his own life. All of our current live presidents and PM owe him including Pervaiz Musharraf , Nawaz Sharif, Shaukat Aziz , Chaudry Shujjat and Zararullah Jamali etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Well there are a lot of conspiracy theories about death of Zia .. the famous ones are

a) Heroin trade financing for afghan war and than subsequently CIA removed all assets involved in it

B) Stinger missile sale commission disputes and subsequent revenge killing within the cartel

c) Revenge Killing by Al –Zulfiqar using Mossad

But for me, it is a 500 year old black magic spell on land of Indus valley and northern part of Indian subcontinent casted by an evil witch that killed Zia. This spell forces new king to be crowned only after death of previous king and forces previous king to love his throne more than his life.

Muhammad Khan Junejo was super human when he overcome this evil spell and actually killed the evil witch by sacrificing his own life. All of our current live presidents and PM owe him including Pervaiz Musharraf , Nawaz Sharif, Shaukat Aziz , Chaudry Shujjat and Zararullah Jamali etc.

What in the world is all this???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

have heard about one late PAF Chief (i.e. Fokker crash) as well (not in combination with Zia etc but just as part of a bigger scheme of things !) ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

No, it was pilot's mistake, zarrar.The Pilot of Fokker crashed it into mountain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

No, it was pilot's mistake, zarrar.The Pilot of Fokker crashed it into mountain.

I have heard about some plane crash in the mountains of northern areas but nothing got recovered from the place-- that plane gone in mystery. What about that?

I fear there exist some Bermuda Triangle in those mountains? :)

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Well, this is what i have been told by retired PAF AM...He said it was entirely Pilot's mistake and it was not sabotaged.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

http://dailytimes.com.pk/default.asp?page=2009\09\12\story_12-9-2009_pg3_2

ANALYSIS: Why commemorate September 6? —Shaukat Qadir

We are aware that our formations were unprepared and the Indian attack took us by surprise. This, despite the fact that we had captured the Indian offensive plans from a dispatch rider on September 1! Do we commemorate the fact that we were taken by surprise and began our response on September 6

This question arose at a recent discussion; but with a twist: do we commemorate the incompetence of our senior military leadership, or the courage of our junior officers and other ranks of all three services?

The question intrigued me since. While I had studied the 1965 war in some detail, this question had never occurred to me. Particularly, why September 6; why not September 23, the day we concluded with a stalemate? If we celebrate the commencement of this war, why not the date in August when ‘Operation Gibraltar’ was launched in Indian-held Kashmir to ‘liberate’ Kashmir from India?

There is little doubt that, like the Kargil War, it was an aberration and one that we had initiated (surprisingly, the similarities between ‘65 and Kargil had also not occurred to me). There is also little doubt that junior officers and all other ranks on both sides, Pakistani and Indian, performed well; in certain instances, exceedingly well. There is also little doubt that, by and large, senior officers on both sides distinguished themselves by their incompetence.

There were exceptions, like Major-General Abdullah Malik (I am sure there must also have been some on the Indian side), but they were few and far between and, what is more, they were not utilised to the extent of their capability. Abdulah Malik was sacked when he was within sight of Akhnur during ‘Operation Grand Slam’. We will never know if he could have captured Akhnur before it was reinforced, but we can be certain that if it could have been captured, it could only have been possible if he remained in command.

We are aware that our formations were unprepared and the Indian attack took us by surprise. This, despite the fact that we had captured the Indian offensive plans from a dispatch rider on September 1! Do we commemorate the fact that we were taken by surprise and began our response on September 6?

The fact that India attacked us across the international borders on September 6 and, with a far larger force at its disposal, with the additional advantage of having taken us by surprise, could not inflict a decisive defeat to our forces and was forced to accept a stalemate is indeed a source of consolation. Though all that proves is that the Indian armed forces were even worse led than ours.

Indeed, the counter-offensive through Kasur was a masterstroke and, whoever came up with the plan was a military genius (there are too many claimants to this credit to be sure, but I am of the view that General Gul Hassan, then Director Military Operations, is responsible). General Chaudhry, the then Indian army chief, records in his memoirs that he decided to call off the main effort in Sialkot and the auxiliary one in Lahore at the start of this counter offensive. Fortunately for the Indian armed forces, he decided to delay his decision for twenty-four hours. Had he not done so, the Indian forces would have faced the ignominy of another defeat, rather than just a stalemate.

However, this masterstroke was a disaster. Far from handing us the victory that it could have, it merely ended in leaving behind a few dozen tanks, mired in mud, which the Indians subsequently paraded before the media. This ‘strike force’ could not have been given a worse commander than Major-General Naseer, who lacked the intrepid courage essential to make a success of this manoeuvre, and instead of carrying out a bold strike, crawled along, much akin to the Indian 1 Armoured Division in Sialkot.

The Pakistan Air Force, its pilots and the oft forgotten ground crew, did us proud. It outfought the Indian Air Force in all departments and, led in person by Air Marshal Nur Khan, is the one service that can claim victory in ‘65. But the PAF commemorates September 7, the day it established its supremacy over the IAF.

Neither the Pakistan Air Force nor the Pakistan Navy were taken into confidence by the army, but witnessing developments, the respective chiefs of both took precautionary steps in the event of a war. I must not fail to acknowledge the contribution of the PN: even though elements of the Indian Navy surrounded our port and it was bombing Karachi, the submarine Ghazi had been put to sea by the Naval Chief Admiral AR Khan before September 6, on his own initiative, and this lone submarine denied exit to the Indian armada docked at Bombay.

I still can’t answer the question as to why we commemorate September 6, nor indeed can I find an answer to why we undertook this misadventure that we were fortunate to come out of, unscathed.

The Indians certainly didn’t want this war. They had been defeated by the Chinese in 1962; they had attempted to regain some pride by taking the Rann of Kutch from us earlier the same year and were again defeated. The last thing they were looking for was another war.

Since I can only conjecture and refuse to accept that Ayub Khan, whom I hold in some respect for his contributions preceding 1965, lacked foresight and accepted Zulfikar Ali Bhutto’s assessment that India’s response to Operation Gibraltar would be confined to the LoC in Kashmir, the only explanation that appears reasonable to me is that he needed to redeem himself in the eyes of his countrymen.

In 1965, Ayub’s popularity had plummeted. It was commonly accepted that he rigged the 1964 elections against Fatima Jinnah, elections that he would have won anyway. Following the elections, two of his sons opened fire on an election rally, killing thirty odd people; the daughter of the IG Police, Mr Anwar Ali, was kidnapped and, again one of his sons was considered the principal suspect. When Ayub blocked the investigation of this kidnapping, he lost his strongest supporter: the Nawab of Kalabagh resigned from his position as Governor of West Pakistan.

Ayub was a man of potential, but two of his sons cost him dearly; did they also cost the country by, indirectly, causing this war?

I honestly cannot answer these questions, but this, as I stated earlier, is the only reasonable explanation. I do think that inquiries of all such misadventures must be undertaken, however fruitless they might be, and questions answered for posterity. I also think that the authorities should decide what we are commemorating and when we actually should commemorate it.

The writer is a former vice president and founder of the Islamabad Policy Research Insititute (IPRI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Well, this is what i have been told by retired PAF AM...He said it was entirely Pilot's mistake and it was not sabotaged.

Could you tell me about that plane crash in detail? What surprises me that nothing was found on spot? Where was the wreckage of plane?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I think someone has been mailing out heroin to the Pakdef members lately.:D

Wheres my batch by the way!:P

A lot of people wanted Zia dead so he got exactly what was coming to him. If you want the secrets of the state opened up then petition it by speaking to your local representative. I know you are probably very cynical about that working but people power is very powerful.

Never mind Bro, it was neither heroin nor non stop watching of "Sleeping beauty" which made me come up this "curse from an evil Witch" theory but rather national guilt.

I have good "general" understanding of how zia got killed but I really failed to understand why our rulers have to be killed or send to exile before next one comes in.

Even India had few ex-prime ministers living happily in their own countries without any fear of unjust prosecution while their opponents are sitting in top slots in country.

On a personal note I was really happy when Zia dismissed Mohammad Khan Junejo government and asked him to go home rather than sending him to Sihala Rest house and than to LHC death squad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Dawn Letters to Editor

THIS refers to a report regarding the separate claims by Brig ® Imtiaz and Ijazul Haq that the US had obstructed the conducting of inquiry by the FBI into the crash of the C-130 aeroplane that had killed Gen Ziaul Haq, along with several other generals as well as the US ambassador and their military attaché, on Aug 17, 1988.

According to the same story, the American embassy has reportedly denied the allegations that the US was involved in the incident or that it blocked the investigations (Sept 7).

It would be interesting to review what Brig. M. Yousaf, the director of the ISI’s Afghan Bureau from 1983 to 1987, had written on the subject in his book, The Bear Trap, since it provides very sound arguments.

While strongly subscribing to the view that the crash was the result of sabotage, although he did not hold the Americans responsible for it, he has demonstrated that the FBI was indeed prevented from conducting an inquiry.

He has argued that the US State Department would not have wanted the incident to be shown to be sabotage for various reasons. For instance, such a fact would imply murder of the two American officials who were on board and would cause the American public to demand to know the culprits.

The government would find it impossible to silence the call for retribution. This could hurt US policy objectives in the area and elsewhere in the world.

If the Soviet KGB or its Afghan surrogate KHAD was found to be involved, revealing the USSR as organiser of mass murder, of assassination of a head of state (Zia), this could lead to hostility with Moscow and even reverse the withdrawal of Soviet troops from Afghanistan.

Likewise, if the plotters were found to be within the Pakistan military, the American people would be outraged that after years of massive support to the military and the Afghan mujahideen, they had killed the US ambassador and a brigadier-general, which would wreck the US-Pakistan relations.

The writer then reveals that the US State Department, therefore, did four things immediately after the crash which, when taken together, point to a cover-up. First, within hours, it sent a team of purely technical air force advisers to assist the PAF board of inquiry.

Second, it did not insist, through the embassy, on autopsies of the bodies, thereby ensuring that essential evidence would get buried along with the bodies.

Third, it sent a Deputy National Security Adviser, Robert Oakley, to take over as ambassador, who could be depended upon to keep things quiet.

Interestingly, later on, in June 1989, he told a highly sceptical congressional sub-committee that he had not advised a meeting of their National Security Council to act on the “Long Arm” law, which made FBI duty-bound to investigate terrorist acts overseas involving attacks on US citizens, because he had forgotten all about it. This despite the fact that Mr. Oakley had personally lobbied hard to get it passed just three years back. Fourth, and most important, it vetoed the FBI’s request to go to Pakistan. Brig. Yousaf has further observed that it was only after 10 months that congressional pressure forced the State Department to allow three FBI investigators to visit Pakistan.

He says the FBI team seemed to lack enthusiasm and was reportedly instructed not to ask ‘awkward’ questions. Their schedule was arranged by our government and they were apparently more interested in sightseeing than cross-questioning witnesses.

According to a Washington Times source, they only left Islamabad for tourist trips. He sums up that their attitude made it quite clear they were following instructions not to stir the pot.

A ABDULLAH

Karachi

http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect/dawn-content-library/dawn/the-newspaper/letters-to-the-editor/zias-crash-and-the-fbi-999

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

In defence of a former Air Chief

Friday, 25 Sep, 2009 | 01:15 AM PST THESE days numerous controversies are being aired about the causes of the ‘Bahawalpur air crash’. The initiators are trying to convince the general public that the late Air Chief Marshal Zulfiqar Ali Khan had joined hands with India and Israel in a conspiracy leading to the murder of the Army chief and president of Pakistan.

The charge is based on the statement of a ‘Pakistani-turned-Israeli agent’, who was being interrogated for a failed attempt on Pakistani’s nuclear assets.

Zulfiqar Ali Khan, my beloved uncle, was a man of highest integrity, a true patriot and was known to be a legend in the Air Force. I firmly believe that such a noble man could never indulge in a such horrific act, that too by joining hands with India (believed as enemy number one) and Israel!

I support my argument by referring to the rich tribute paid to his departed soul by the Air Force in their special addition (2005) of ‘Shaheen Magazine’.

ACM Jamal A. Khan in his article, ‘The Rebuilder’ of the PAF after the 1971 war, bestows upon him the title of a true patriot. “He left his successor a full strength and a vibrant Air Force,” acknowledges ACM Farooq Feroze Khan. “His integrity was virtually above board,” declares AVM Abdul Rahmin Yousaf Zai.

“He was a legend as an officer of highest integrity and a gentleman of proverbial character,” recalls Air Commodore Sajjad Haider.

ACM Jamal A. Khan further recollects: “Each (Zulfikar Ali Bhutto and Ziaul Haq) treated him with respect for his professional competence and integrity.”

After ACM Zulfiqar’s retirement, when the US offered 120 modern F7s “as an offset for giving up the reprocessing plant,” he advised prime minister Bhutto “to reject A-7 offer, because Pakistan’s nuclear programme should not for any reason be compromised”.

Further to the above, Gen K.M. Arif, Air Chief Marshall Saadat Kalim, Air Marshal Asghar Khan, Air Marshall Ayaz Ahmed Khan, Air Commodore Waheed A. Butt, Air Commodore Anwarul Haq and Squadron Leader Ghani R. Sabzwari from the forces, and former foreign ministers Agha Shahi, Abdul Sattar and retired ambassador Tariq Fatmi all paid very rich tribute to my beloved uncle in the very same magazine. In a parting remark, Air Commodore Aslam Bazmi glorified him as “ a leader with the heart of Gold. He breathed nobility all his life; too dignified to stoop low; too gentle to lose his calm”.

I request the readers to compare the above legend against the accusation of a ‘traitor’, currently serving his sentence for working to sabotage Pakistani nuclear assets.

I would also request the PAF to reproduce relevant articles of ‘Shaheen Magazine’ on their web site for the consumption of the general public.

BRIG ® AGHA ALI HASSAN

Islamabad

http://www.dawn.com/wps/wcm/connect/dawn-content-library/dawn/the-newspaper/letters-to-the-editor/in-defence-of-a-former-air-chief-599

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Oh I'm sorry if my post has no relevance to this thread. What about Great Mufti Mehmood-- father of Great Fazal Rehman? My father long ago told me first hand story about him. My father was educationist when he was Chief Minister of the province. Ones he was presiding the meeting of educationists and my father was present there in meeting. There was some guest from Lahore who was dressed in pant shirt rather than traditional shalwar kameez and that guest was made highly humiliated by Mufti Mehmood that he was made to leave the meeting because of his English dressing.

Mullah's Ethics...:mad::mad:. I'm really fed up to read such dirty characters so called upholders of Islam in History of Pakistan.

.

i am not sure of the greatness of Maulana Fazl-ur-Rehman but there is no doubt about Mufti Mehmood. as a general principle, muftis are usually not bothered about dresses of others let alone humiliating someone in such a gathering.

if this incident is true, this is probably more of him being chief minister and requiring his cabinet members to dress in shalwar kameez. it could also be based on his specific relationship with the person. lot of ulema/auliya have scolded heavily to their students to train them.

Mufti Mehmood worked a great deal with bhutto on the issue of khatme-nabuwwat as well and had no problems working with him despite him being involved in numerous non-ethical things besides not wearing shalwar kameez.

also, in armed forces, the language and the obsceneties that gets hurled at the new guys, would you apply the same logic to them?

i would advice against labelling ulema with such words that have severe deragoratory connotation. Allah Ta'la has given stern warnings in Quran for such behavior.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Governer = Fazl-e-Haq

Shia Cleric = Arif-ul-Hussaini

Bank = BCCI

Do a Google search on Fazl-e-Haq to learn more ....

but wasn't BCCI being used by Pakistan itself?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

i am not sure of the greatness of Maulana Fazl-ur-Rehman but there is no doubt about Mufti Mehmood. as a general principle, muftis are usually not bothered about dresses of others let alone humiliating someone in such a gathering.

if this incident is true, this is probably more of him being chief minister and requiring his cabinet members to dress in shalwar kameez. it could also be based on his specific relationship with the person. lot of ulema/auliya have scolded heavily to their students to train them.

Mufti Mehmood worked a great deal with bhutto on the issue of khatme-nabuwwat as well and had no problems working with him despite him being involved in numerous non-ethical things besides not wearing shalwar kameez.

also, in armed forces, the language and the obsceneties that gets hurled at the new guys, would you apply the same logic to them?

i would advice against labelling ulema with such words that have severe deragoratory connotation. Allah Ta'la has given stern warnings in Quran for such behavior.

Well we can see public contribution of politicians cum Ulema in NWFP from Muti Mahoood to Akram Durrani by looking at broken raods, dilapidated public buildings and poorly maintained streets of Peshawar. The Muftis I have seen are generally obsessed with criticizing from dress to any thing who differ with them and great Aalms of JUI including late Mufti Mahmood and Ghulam Ghaos Hazarvi were no exception.

You can easily visualize how will they criticize an English dress wearing gentlemen when you look at some of literary work under their supervision such as book Fitna Moududiayat written to discredit Moulana Moudoodi.

I really do not know if story narrated by HameedI is true or not true but one thing is for sure that every body including you , me and HameedI have right to criticize late Moulana

Mufti Mahmood (I prefer not to so as it is point less by now) as he was public servant on tax payer money when he worked as Chief Minister but not other way around as we are private Citizens of Pakistan. He had authority and right to fire any NWFP government functionary but no right to humiliate any body and bad behavior by Army certainly does not grant such right too.

And if you have an interpretation of any verse of Quran which makes you believe that Quran does not allow a public servant to be criticized, than that interpretation is wrong as this is a simple principle of fairness which is very basis of Islam.

Aaalim of Islam , if he is a private Citizen should not be criticized but if he choose to be public figure and do political ‘bayan’s on TV and newspaper , it would be Childish to assume he will not face any criticism.

If he is public servent and recieve benefits from public funds that criticism is absolute required.

As always, names calling, cursing and humiliation is off limit in any decent society and I expect that is not considered part of criticism which we do here at Pakdef.

This is fairness and equality that was envisioned by our Founding father Mohammad Ali Jinnah.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Nicely put Ajmal Sb. I can't put better than this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

i am not sure of the greatness of Maulana Fazl-ur-Rehman but there is no doubt about Mufti Mehmood. as a general principle, muftis are usually not bothered about dresses of others let alone humiliating someone in such a gathering.

if this incident is true, this is probably more of him being chief minister and requiring his cabinet members to dress in shalwar kameez. it could also be based on his specific relationship with the person. lot of ulema/auliya have scolded heavily to their students to train them.

Mufti Mehmood worked a great deal with bhutto on the issue of khatme-nabuwwat as well and had no problems working with him despite him being involved in numerous non-ethical things besides not wearing shalwar kameez.

also, in armed forces, the language and the obsceneties that gets hurled at the new guys, would you apply the same logic to them?

i would advice against labelling ulema with such words that have severe deragoratory connotation. Allah Ta'la has given stern warnings in Quran for such behavior.

Khawaja Sb, No one is above criticism and I can pull loads of stories from Islamic Books to corroborate my claims. Hazrat Omar (ra) used to hire the people to take critical evaluation of his governance. He welcomed criticism and pitfalls in his character and governance.

You are cautioning me that there is warning in Holy Quran for "derogatory connotations" against "Ullama". What not else is in Quran? There is heavy punishment for these contractors of Islam who deviate and misdirect the Muslims like your favorites are doing. "Mufti" Mehmood is among the progenitor of the militancy which we experience today.

You hold, "I am not sure of the greatness of Maulana Fazl-ur-Rehman", Oh, it sounds really pathetic. You are kidding. Who doesn't know the "greatness" of aforesaid "Hazrat Maulana Fazl-ur-Rehman, Damat-e-Burakatahum, Mujahid-e-Terrorism, Ameer-e-Munafiqeen, Rehber-e-Corruption ". I think it defines him well. And you KNOW better than I do.

Now, Let me straighten some facts.

JUI-F held a conference few years back about the "Role of Muslim Heroes in Independence", they eulogized the role of their "Ullama" while virtually ignoring M-Ali Jinnah and other stalwarts of Muslim League.

Who doesn't know about the role of these "sold out Mullahs" ??

The "Great Mufti" remained the staunch supporter of Congress till his last breath. Don't forget his statement, "Thank god we were not part of the sin of making Pakistan".

I don't respect such back stabber traitor "Mullahs".

The "Great Charlatan Mufti" was struck off from Daruloom Davooband by Madni because of violating disciplinary acts. Then Mufti went to Jamia Mazahar Uloom and he was again expelled. He couldn't complete his "religious education" from well reputed Madrassa and he ended up in Muradabad.

This "Great Mufti" even disregarded scholars like Molana Shabbir Usmani who was pro-Muslim league.

I'm running short of time, otherwise, I can pull out some more facts for you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0