Indian Missile Programe

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A little correct Bharat is not part of PAK-FA for sometime now

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http://www.dawn.com/news/1258638/india-successfully-tests-interceptor-missile

India successfully tests interceptor missile
FROM THE NEWSPAPER — UPDATED ABOUT AN HOUR AGO
 
 
 
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BALASORE (Odisha): In its efforts to have a full-fledged and multi-layered Ballistic Missile Defence system, India on Sunday successfully test-fired indigenously developed supersonic interceptor missile, capable of destroying any incoming ballistic missile, from a test range off Odisha coast.
 
“The test conducted to validate various parameters of the interceptor in flight mode has been successful,” Defence Research Develop­ment Organisation (DRDO) sources said.
 
The interceptor engaged a target which was a naval version of Prithvi missile launched from a ship anchored inside Bay of Bengal, taking up the trajectory of the “hostile ballistic missile”.
 
The target missile was launched at about 11:15am and the interceptor, an Advanced Air Defence missile positioned on the Abdul Kalam island (Wheeler Island), roared through its trajectory to destroy the “hostile missile” in mid-air after getting signals from tracking radars, the sources said.
 
“The ‘kill’ effect of the interceptor was ascertained by analysing data from multiple tracking sources,” a DRDO scientist said.
 
The interceptor is a 7.5-metre-long single-stage solid rocket-propelled guided missile equipped with a navigation system, a hi-tech computer and an electro-mechanical activator, the sources said.
 
The interceptor had its own mobile launcher, secure data link for inter­ception, independent tracking and homing capabilities and sophisticated radars, they added.
 
By arrangement with the Times of India
 
Published in Dawn, May 16th, 2016

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Is this even possible?

 

Interceptor missile mission a ‘failure’

 

T. S. SUBRAMANIAN

  
The interceptor never took off to intercept incoming “enemy” missile, say sources
 

The interceptor missile mission, which took place on May 15, was a failure despite claims of the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) to the contrary. The interceptor never took off to intercept the incoming “enemy” missile which merely fell into the Bay of Bengal, informed sources said.

 

An agency report on May 16 said a modified Prithvi missile was launched on May 15 from a naval ship in the Bay of Bengal and it mimicked the trajectory of a missile coming from an enemy country.

 

‘Never took off’

 

Informed sources, however, said the interceptor missile never took off from the island; so no interception took place at all. “Post-flight analysis is going on. We do not know whether there was problem in detecting the missile, whether radars tracked it and communicated it to the interceptor,” said the sources.

 

The DRDO developed both the Prithvi missile and the interceptor.

 

2015 mission failed too

 

In April 2015, a similar mission failed after the interceptor dived into the Bay of Bengal a few seconds after lift off. In that mission, the DRDO planned to conduct the test against an electronic target missile. In April 2014, the warhead in the interceptor failed to explode, although the interception of the incoming “enemy” missile took place at an altitude of 120 km.

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Assalamaoalukum,

 

Hahahaha...how can you call this a failure??? It was a spectacular failure!!

 

Just like their camera in a tin box Mars mission and yet to be disclosed space capsule mission.

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I did mention this on another thread that it was way too early to draw any conclusions on this indian test as there was zero information available on the quality and specifications of this system. Also remember this is a country which expertly lies and falsifies information and data.

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Just been happened to be 'passing by' today (idly browsing - had a bit of time on my hands). Thought I'd share (fortunately I still remembered my account password) -

 

 

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Assalamaoalukum,

 

I will sit down and go over this video. It looks suspeciously like something I have seen before somewhere. I could be wrong though. Isnt incoming "missile" seems awfully slow? Was it an ICBM or missile shot down simulation then the target should be moving a lot faster.

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I sometimes don't comprehend why some indian members would want to post something silly like this. But then I tell myself that systematic lying is an art form in india. Systematic falsification of economic data, and manipulation of data related to failed major military projects are perfect examples of such activities.

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So now we find out what happened in the failed anti ballistic test in May. The interceptor never lifted off because the target failed!

So first they have to make sure that the target Prithvi missile works right.

India test-fires mimic enemy missile

http://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/2016/nov/16/india-test-fires-mimic-enemy-missile-1539350.html

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Jawabi test?  Trying to prove they have working second strike capability when they don't?

 

India set to test launch another nuke missile on January 31st

http://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/2017/jan/23/india-set-to-test-launch-another-nuke-missile-on-january-31st-1562525.html

 

By Hemant Kumar Rout  |  Express News Service  |   Published: 23rd January 2017 05:30 AM  |

 

BHUBANESWAR: The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) is readying for a fresh trial of its long range nuke-capable submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) K-4 from an underwater platform in the last week of this month.

 

India.jpg

 

If things go as per the programme, defence sources said the indigenously built most powerful underwater missile having a strike range of around 3,500 km will be test fired from a submerged pontoon, which is almost identical to a submarine, on January 31.

 

Though the missile has been designed to be launched from a depth of 50 metres, this time the scientists are planning to fire it from the undersea platform nearly 20-30 metre deep in the Bay of Bengal.

 

A defence official said while the preparation for the test is going on in full swing, tracking equipment has been moved in ships to be placed at test location and point of impact.

 

Having a length of 12 metres and diameter of 1.3 metres, K-4 missile weighs around 17 tonne and is capable of carrying a warhead of around two tonne. Basically a ballistic missile, the K-4 combines the aspects of both cruise and ballistic missile, which use multiple-stage rockets to exit the atmosphere and re-enter in a parabolic trajectory.   :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes: 

 

The country’s first indigenous nuclear submarine INS Arihant has already been inducted in the Indian Navy and this submarine will be equipped with the K-series missiles.

 

Apart from the 700-km range K-15, renamed as B-05, which has been successfully test fired several times and K-4, India has one more missile in the series. SLBM K-5 having a striking capability of over 5,000 km is under development.

 

All the K-series missiles are faster, lighter and stealthier. The missiles are far more difficult to tackle as they skulk clandestinely undersea and manoeuvrable thus minimising the chance to be shot down by the enemy.

 

Apart from the K-series missiles, India has the submarine version of BrahMos supersonic cruise missile in its arsenal to boost its second-strike capabilities. The DRDO is also developing the air version of K-series missiles which can be fitted with fighter aircraft.

 

The DRDO is expecting a successful trial of the missile as it would strengthen the country’s position in the exclusive club of six nations including Russia, USA, France, Britain and China which have the capability of firing missiles from air, land and undersea.

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Posted · Report post

They are so pissed that they dont even mention the 7th Country PAkistan :D ...Oh Dear Good, the Bhindians and their low esteem ego :D

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Posted · Report post

i just loved the beginning of the article: A key american partner, India..... ;)

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I think India is seriously feeling the heat from Pakistan's nuclear and missile capability.  They keep saying "second strike capability" when they don't have it.  Arihant is a training platform/test bed.  Their Russian nuke sub cannot carry nukes.

 

They also keep trying to give the impression that they have ABM capability.  They don't.  In the most recent test, the Prithvi "interceptor" actually managed to take off from the ground.  It was declared an immediate success with no evidence of successful interception.  Modi went on the offensive asking whether the opposition will ask for evidence for this as well, just like the "surgical strikes"?

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India’s extended-range supersonic missile makes ‘historic’ maiden flight

https://www.rt.com/news/380323-brahmos-india-cruise-missile/

 

Published time: 11 Mar, 2017 17:55
Edited time: 11 Mar, 2017 18:00
 
58c41d02c36188be018b45c5.jpg
FILE PHOTO: An Indian soldier stands guard near a truck mounted with Brahmos cruise missiles © Kamal Kishore / Reuters
 
 
India has successfully tested a version of the BrahMos supersonic cruise missile with its range extended from the original 300km to 450km. The extension was reportedly prompted by India’s joining a rocket technology control treaty last year.

On Saturday, an upgraded BrahMos made its maiden flight from a mobile launcher at a testing range near Chandipur, Odisha state, the Indian Express reported. Kumar Mishra, managing director of BrahMos Aerospace Limited, the joint venture handling the project, who witnessed the test, called it a “textbook launch.” 

 

“In a historical first, the formidable missile system once again proved its mettle to precisely hit enemy targets at a much higher range. The land-attack version of the supersonic cruise system met its mission parameters in a copybook manner,” Mishra was cited as saying.

 

The version of the missile used in the launch had an upgraded guidance system and was reported as having a range of 450km.

 

“With the successful test firing, the Indian armed forces will be empowered to knock down enemy targets far beyond 400km. BrahMos has thus proved its prowess once again as the best supersonic cruise missile system in the world,” Mishra said.

 

BrahMos is a missile based on the Russian P-800 Oniks anti-ship rocket. NPO Mashinostroyeniya, the developer of the Oniks, teamed up with India’s Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO) to develop the joint project, with Moscow providing the propulsion system and India responsible for the guidance missile.

 

The original BrahMos has been in service since 2006, but its range was specified as 300km. The reason was reportedly not technology limitations but rather legal restrictions. Since 1995, Russia has been part of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), an international agreement that limits export to potentially dangerous actors of crucial rocket technology that can be used to develop delivery systems for weapons of mass destruction.

 

At the time BrahMos was being developed, India was not part of the MTCR, joining the regime only in June last year. Shortly afterward, India and Russia agreed to upgrade the cruise missile, potentially doubling its range to 600km.

 

BrahMos missiles can travel at speeds of up to Mach 3 and can carry a conventional payload of 300kg. The types of rocket currently in service are land-launched and ship-launched, but submarine-launched and aircraft-launched versions are in the testing phase. 

 

The Russian-Indian joint venture is expected to develop another hypersonic missile dubbed BrahMos II

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An Indian Nuclear-Capable Ballistic Missile Test Failed Shortly After Launch. What Happened?

http://thediplomat.com/2017/05/an-indian-nuclear-capable-ballistic-missile-test-failed-shortly-after-launch-what-happened/

 

India will be looking to get to the bottom of what caused an Agni-2 MRBM to fail early in flight in user-testing.

thediplomat_2017-01-17_04-07-14-36x36.jp
May 05, 2017
 
On Thursday, India sought to test one of its Agni-II nuclear-capable medium-range ballistic missiles. The user-trial, which took place on Abdul Kalam Island off India’s eastern coast on Thursday, failed, according to sources who spoke to the Press Trust of India. “The two-stage, solid-fueled missile was just half a kilometer into its initial flight trajectory when things went awry. The mission had to be aborted,” one source noted. The Agni-II, first tested by India’s Defense Research and Development Organisation, has been a cornerstone of India’s strategic nuclear forces since the mid-2000s.
 

India has seen its fair share of missile tests recently, most notably with the Nirbhay cruise missile program as my colleague Franz-Stefan Gady has explained, but an Agni-II failing a user-trial may be a source of concern. At this point, with neither the Indian Department of Defense or the Defense Research and Development Organisation having made any comment or released any further information, there’s little to go on but the anonymously sourced comment. Still, given what little we know about this test and the Agni-II, there are a few possible explanations for what went wrong.

 

If it is true that the missile “went awry” just 500 meters or so into its boost phase, that would represent a fairly significant failure. The Agni-II’s range is thought to be in the range of 2,000 to 3,000 kilometers, putting it at the higher end of what the United States Department of Defense would classify as a medium-range ballistic missile. It is a two-stage system that uses solid propellant. India’s Agni-II inventory has seen iterative improvements over the years, focusing mostly on improving the system’s guidance and accuracy. A user-trial failure at a later phase in the flight would suggest perhaps some sort of guidance failure.

 

A failure early in the missile’s boost phase could also suggest that the particular unit chosen for testing suffered from cracks or gaps in the solid propellant grain, which would allow for a build-up of pressure upon ignition and, ultimately, failure. Scanning for these sorts of deficiencies requires equipment, including industrial x-ray scanners, that India only recently developed indigenously after being unable to import scanners from abroad. Various conditions — ranging from sharp temperature changes to stress in transportation — could have affected the propellant grain of this Agni-II, which could have been in storage for more than a decade.

 

It’s worth recalling that the Agni-II has seen failures before, though in developmental testing, and some critics have noted that the missile was inducted into India’s nuclear forces after insufficient testing. A failed nighttime test of the system in 2009 saw its successful boost, ascent, and separation of the second stage, with the failure ultimately coming down to guidance. Given the system’s age, however, if the problem that caused the latest test comes down to poor propellant casting early on in India’s missile development, New Delhi will no doubt be looking to discover what portion of its existing solid fuel missiles may suffer from similar issues.

 

Ultimately, this latest failure could have come down to a fluke, but that’s likely not an assumption India’s Strategic Forces Command will adopt willingly. Even if the remainder of India’s stockpile may stand in good stead, the SFC will be looking for assurance that these missiles can perform when needed. The public perception of the failed test will also be worth watching; a successive failure could raise wider concern about the health of India’s strategic deterrent. One need only look at the United Kingdom’s public debate surrounding a Trident II D5 test failure for a reminder of how things can spiral. It turns out that aggregate failure rates for the Trident over decades remain within acceptable ranges. Given the comparatively younger lifespan of the Agni-II, India will no doubt be looking to get to the bottom of this matter.

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Posted · Report post

 

Of course Russkie manuals were not translated properly - Last time there was such a failure Russkies were at their launch site all over the place.

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It is pretty honest of them for disclosing their failures. 

 

has Pakistan ever disclosed any failures except one on 1999?

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