US helping India become a Nuclear Fiendish Country

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Posted · Report post

Well worth a read.  This Make in India is the best thing that every happened to Pakistan.

 

Former atomic energy regulator explains why India needs to pause its nuclear power plans

 

 

I have come across literature that paints India's Nuclear power capability in a state of disrepair. This article confirms it.

 

 They have rushed ahead to get the reactor started, and now it is not operational 80 percent of the time.

 

How can they keep Effing up everything they get their hands on! They have the luxury of living in a neighborhood where they are surrounded by much smaller militaries. And China is no threat to them despite their cries due to Himalayas among other things. The world is throwing stuff at them too yet they can't make anything work. France and US opening nuclear technology to them. US has flooded them with forex reserves by opening up the H1B visa and handing over their IT industry to them. Over a million IT jobs in the US have gone to Indians in the last 15 years leading to highest remittances. Russia has been "joint venturing" with them for decades. Every western company offering consulting services for their defense projects. Japan is throwing investment at them. The list goes on... Still the superpower flounders!

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Posted · Report post

They have rushed ahead to get the reactor started, and now it is not operational 80 percent of the time.

 

Just like Arjun.

 

It is the same pattern that permeates everything Indian.

 

"India wanted transfer of technology because we are weak in two areas – Enrichment of uranium and Reprocessing of spent fuel (EnR technology)."

 

So how are they going to make weapons?  No uranium and no plutonium.

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Pakistan should put out a statement, and raise concern about this and that India should improve its safety. Besides, plant isnt that far from our border.
 
 
Water leak forces shutdown of Indian nuclear plant
AFP — PUBLISHED 20 MINUTES AGO
      
 
 No radioactive material has leaked from the Kakrapar Atomic Power Station in Gujarat, the director of the site said. —AFP/File
No radioactive material has leaked from the Kakrapar Atomic Power Station in Gujarat, the director of the site said. —AFP/File
 
AHMEDABAD: A reactor at a nuclear plant in western India was shut down on Friday after a water leak was discovered, officials said, stressing that workers had not been exposed to radiation.
 
No radioactive material had leaked from the Kakrapar Atomic Power Station in the coastal state of Gujarat, the director of the site said.
 
“Consequent to a small leak in the primary heat transport system, the reactor was shut down as intended as per design provisions,” L. K. Jain said in a statement.
 
“All safety systems are working as intended. The radioactivity/radiation levels in the plant premises and outside are normal.” The unit was shut down at about 9am (local time) and would restart only after officials from India's Atomic Energy Regulatory Board inspect the plant and give it the go-ahead.
 
The plant's two reactors produce 440 megawatts of power, while two more are being built.
 
In 2011, four labourers at the plant were exposed to radiation when they were painting a tunnel.
 
India's 20 nuclear plants currently account for less than 2 per cent of its power capacity.
 
Although the government wants to boost this to 25 per cent by 2050, concerns over radiation leaks and the effect on residents living near proposed sites have led to protests and stalling of major projects.
 
In 2014, six workers suffered nearly 50 per cent burns at a Russian-backed plant in southern Tamil Nadu state.
 

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Posted · Report post

Agreed given proximity to our border, but need to be seletive. Dont want to ring too many alarm bells of Indian plants being unsafe internationally and open up greater access to western nuclear technology to replace their reactors.

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Indian nuclear security measures weaker than Pakistan's: report

DAWN.COM — PUBLISHED 30 MINUTES AGO
 
INDIA: A report examining nuclear security worldwide suggests India's "nuclear security measures may be weaker than those of Pakistan", but says the risk "appears to be moderate", while claiming risk of nuclear theft in Pakistan "appears to be high".
 
The Harvard Kennedy School report, "Preventing Nuclear Terrorism: Continuous Improvement or Dangerous Decline?", says it is difficult to judge whether India's nuclear security is capable of protecting against the threats it faces, though it is likely adversary threats in India are "less extreme" than those in Pakistan.
 
Putting Pakistan "at risk for nuclear theft", the report says: "Overall, the risk of nuclear theft in Pakistan appears to be high," citing "some of the world’s most capable terrorist groups, an environment of widespread corruption and extremist sympathies" as risk factors.
 
The possibility of collapse of the government in Pakistan or an "extremist takeover cannot be entirely ruled out".
 
While there is "no clear trend, either upward or downward" regarding the level of risk for Indian nuclear sites, it highlights a trend "toward increasing risk" in Pakistan as its nuclear arsenal expands and the strategic doctrine shifts toward tactical nuclear weapons.
 
Read: ‘Pakistan has built low-yield nuclear weapons to counter Indian aggression’
 
Stronger nuclear security?
 
"Pakistan has substantially strengthened its nuclear security in the past two decades," the report says, citing changes in organisations governing nuclear security, training, equipment and approaches to screening personnel, requirements for nuclear material accounting and control, approaches to strengthening security culture and "substantial changes in every other aspect of nuclear security covered in the survey" as reasons for the improved nuclear security.
 
Measures taken to secure Pakistan's nuclear weapons highlighted in the report include: - Allotment of 25,000 troops to guard Pakistan's nuclear stocks and facilities by the Strategic Plans Division (SPD) - Equipment of sites with extensive barriers and detection systems - Separate storage of nuclear weapons components ─ although this may change as Pakistan shifts towards tactical nuclear weapons intended for rapid deployment - Equipment of weapons with locks to prevent unauthorised use - Extensive cooperation with the United States to improve nuclear security
 
The report also highlights negative trends including: - Absence of recent US expressions of confidence - Shift towards rapid-deployment tactical nuclear weapons - A 'probable' increase in the number of locations as a result of an increase in the number of weapons
 
The report says Pakistan "must protect against almost overwhelming adversary threats" which include terrorist groups that have demonstrated "that they are willing and able to launch complex, well-coordinated attacks on heavily defended military targets within Pakistan", as was the case in the 2014 attempted hijacking of a naval frigate by Al Qaeda's South Asian affiliate "with the idea of using its anti-ship missiles to attack US naval vessels".
 
The report quotes Defence Minister Khawaja Asif telling parliament 'these people could not have breached security without assistance from inside'.
 
Corruption, it says, "can create additional opportunities for insider recruitment".
 
However, despite a variety of negative US media reports on Pakistan's nuclear security, "US officials from President Obama to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff have repeatedly expressed confidence in Pakistani nuclear security arrangements".
 
It also says the US Defense Intelligence Agency Director "testified in February 2015 that improvements were continuing".
 
"It is notable, however, that these statements of confidence have not been repeated at recent high-level US-Pakistani meetings — suggesting that the United States has concerns about some elements of Pakistan’s nuclear security approach," it said.
 
Read: Differences on nuclear issue surface at US strategic talks
 
'Why 2016 will be pivotal for nuclear security'
 
The report calls 2016 a pivotal year for nuclear security, saying "actions in Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan and elsewhere will affect the shape of the terrorist threat for years to come".
 
The selection of a new US president may also impact nuclear security initiatives depending on whether or not he or she makes nuclear security a priority, it says.
 
US and Russia, the two countries with the largest nuclear stockpiles, may or may not find ways to "revitalise their cooperation" in this area after suspension of such measures following escalating tensions over Ukraine and other issues.
 
'Ideal scenario by 2030'
Pakistan and India capping their nuclear arsenals and agreeing to confidence-building measures or "other steps that greatly reduce the probability of crises that would lead to the dispersal of nuclear weapons to front-line forces" are among the report's ideal scenarios by the year 2030.
 
However, Pakistan and India have continued to expand their arsenals and continue relying on "doctrines likely to lead to early dispersal of those weapons in the event of a crisis".
 
Processes for better nuclear security have atrophied over time, the report claims, saying, "No genuinely effective new mechanisms for bringing high-level policy makers together to advance the field have emerged."
 

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Posted · Report post

India’s growing N-arsenal threat to regional peace: FO
 
By Our Correspondent
Published: October 29, 2016
 
ISLAMABAD: As the escalating war of words between Pakistan and India translated into daily skirmishes at the border, Islamabad on Friday raised the nuclear spectre by expressing concerns over India’s fast growing military nuclear programme.
 
“Pakistan has long maintained that India’s rapidly expanding military nuclear programme poses a grave threat to peace and stability in the region and beyond,” said Foreign Office Spokesperson Nafees Zakaria at his weekly briefing.
 
Pakistan offers India bilateral arrangement on non-testing of nuclear weapons
 
A recent groundbreaking research study revealed that India already has sufficient material and technical capacity to make 356 to 492 nuclear bombs. This work is in contrast to several earlier studies which took a much modest view of the Indian nuclear bomb making potential.
 
 
 
A study titled ‘Indian Unsafeguarded Nuclear Programme’, published by the Institute of Strategic Studies, Islamabad (ISSI) and co-authored by four nuclear scholars, unveils a new and comprehensive assessment of India’s nuclear weapon capacity.
 
“These concerns have been fully validated by publicly available reports on significant upcoming fissile material facilities and build up of unsafeguarded weapon usable fissile material in India,” the spokesperson said while responding to the new study.
 
Zakaria attributed the rapid growth in India’s nuclear build up to the waiver granted to the neighboring country in 2008 by the Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG).
 
“It was unfortunate that the NSG did not require India to make any worthwhile non-proliferation commitments at the time,” he regretted. He warned that another country-specific exemption by the NSG on the membership question would only further exacerbate the ill effects of the 2008 exemption.
 
Top UN court rejects Marshall Islands nuclear case against India, Pakistan
 
“It remains our hope that the NSG member states would make a well-considered decision this time keeping in view its long-term implications for the global non-proliferation regime as well as strategic stability in our region,” the spokesperson further said.
 
When asked about the charges against the Indian official who was being expelled, Zakaria said Surjeet Singh was involved in activities which were not in the interest of our national security.
 
Rejecting criticism against Pakistan for not acting decisively against all militant groups, the spokesperson made it clear that Pakistan did not draw any distinction between terrorist groups.  “We will not allow our land to be used against any other country,” he maintained.
 
“Pakistan in fact is the victim of foreign funded terrorist elements and the recent Quetta attack is a clear proof of it,” Zakaria added in a clear reference to the involvement of Indian intelligence agency in subversive activities.
 
Responding to the reported statement by US general stationed in Afghanistan that the Haqqani network had a free run in Pakistan, the spokesperson replied, “Let me refer to some media reports in June and August this year reporting killing of a senior leader and four senior Commanders of Haqqani Network in Afghanistan by the US forces, which clearly indicate where the Haqqanis are.”
 
About Pakistan’s decision to attend the Heart of Asia conference in India, the spokesperson said this process was aimed at bringing peace and stability to Afghanistan with the collaboration of regional countries.
 
Foreign Office says it will expel Indian diplomat
 
Responding to another question that diplomatic community expressed concerns regarding the security situation due to Imran Khan’s planned protest on November 2, he expressed his ignorance about any such development.
 
Published in The Express Tribune, October 29th, 2016.
 

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Posted · Report post

Another angle that Pakistan needs to contend with in the article below.  There is a convergence of interest between the Hindu fundamentalists using soft power and Islam/Muslim haters in the right (Trump et-al included).  The former's focus is solely on defanging of Pakistan.  

 

In my view, Pakistan's FP has totally failed with regards it keeping the relations with the US on an even keel.  The reason I say that is in the recent junket, Mushahid Hussain went on about how Pakistan has other options such as aligning itself with the Russia etc.  In my view, that is a silly and immature approach to take.  If he is visiting the US, the idea should be to figure out ways to close the gap instead of threatening to go into another's arms.  I feel that our idiotic, knee jerk reaction to such things never works out because the Americans also know what the Russians can and cannot do for Pakistan.  In my view, Pakistan's relations with the US are off the rail because you have traditional Pakistani security mindset trying to set an agenda that no longer finds an audience in the US.  If anything, the foreign office should be looking to bring young blood or those Pakistanis who have actually studied and lived in the US to engage with the Americans (Mushahid Hussain is one of them but we need more).  There should be a rethinking so as to ensure that Pakistan is not looked upon as being on an adversarial side by the Americans.  All those thinking Amreeka is in decline are probably writing its obituary a bit too early.  It is a force to reckon with and our relations with the US should be good and if that requires some adjustment on our part, then in my view we should do it.  Because the downside is that if Americans also get on the bandwagon to disrupt Pakistan, it will be difficult for Pakistan to manage the situation because at the end of the day, neither the Chinese nor the Russians are willing to step in for Pakistan.

 

 

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/11/07/hindus-for-trump

 

Another one:

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/the-conversation-global/trump-or-clinton-what-ind_b_12726510.html

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Another angle that Pakistan needs to contend with in the article below.  There is a convergence of interest between the Hindu fundamentalists using soft power and Islam/Muslim haters in the right (Trump et-al included).  The former's focus is solely on defanging of Pakistan.  

 

In my view, Pakistan's FP has totally failed with regards it keeping the relations with the US on an even keel.  The reason I say that is in the recent junket, Mushahid Hussain went on about how Pakistan has other options such as aligning itself with the Russia etc.  In my view, that is a silly and immature approach to take.  If he is visiting the US, the idea should be to figure out ways to close the gap instead of threatening to go into another's arms.  I feel that our idiotic, knee jerk reaction to such things never works out because the Americans also know what the Russians can and cannot do for Pakistan.  In my view, Pakistan's relations with the US are off the rail because you have traditional Pakistani security mindset trying to set an agenda that no longer finds an audience in the US.  If anything, the foreign office should be looking to bring young blood or those Pakistanis who have actually studied and lived in the US to engage with the Americans (Mushahid Hussain is one of them but we need more).  There should be a rethinking so as to ensure that Pakistan is not looked upon as being on an adversarial side by the Americans.  All those thinking Amreeka is in decline are probably writing its obituary a bit too early.  It is a force to reckon with and our relations with the US should be good and if that requires some adjustment on our part, then in my view we should do it.  Because the downside is that if Americans also get on the bandwagon to disrupt Pakistan, it will be difficult for Pakistan to manage the situation because at the end of the day, neither the Chinese nor the Russians are willing to step in for Pakistan.

 

 

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/11/07/hindus-for-trump

 

Another one:

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/the-conversation-global/trump-or-clinton-what-ind_b_12726510.html

 

The other problem with our foreign policy is that we actually do bark a lot about the U.S., but in practice, we do our level best to stay in Washington's good graces. I think we would command much more respect (and clarity within ourselves) if we derived cooler U.S. ties from an actual policy framework, perhaps one of neutrality or independence. So when asked to do something with the Taliban in Afghanistan, we can just say, "no dawg, we have nothing happening in Afghanistan, and we both know there's no Taliban under our control. Peace." No one can openly fault a state for just wanting to mind its own business and not let others drag it into a mess. It might have even given us a chance to restructure our ties with the U.S. to be more economically focused and less security/military-driven.

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The above about Afghanistan would only work if Sartaj Aziz and the likes are not caught with their foot in the mouth type of a situation by making statements that we are hosting the Taliban leadership and its families.  Then only statements like "we have nothing happening in Afghanistan, and we both know there's no Taliban under our control. Peace." work.

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The above about Afghanistan would only work if Sartaj Aziz and the likes are not caught with their foot in the mouth type of a situation by making statements that we are hosting the Taliban leadership and its families.  Then only statements like "we have nothing happening in Afghanistan, and we both know there's no Taliban under our control. Peace." work.

 

That's true, but then again, Sartaj Aziz is our policy framework personified: senile, inept, self-harming, embarrassing, old, no one cares. It wasn't long ago when this guy said, "we will fund F-16s with CSF payments" and then added, "we will look at other options." That's basically our foreign "policy" in a nutshell.

For all the flack we give India, we should at least credit their leadership establishment for actually trying to operate based on an actual framework (one with general acceptance from the entirety of their federal government and state). When one has a consistent and openly understood policy framework, it becomes easier to convey a narrative and invite confidence. 

Unfortunately, Pakistani leaders do not run Pakistan as a proper state, but as though it's a family run convenience store with a shortage of cigarettes.

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Could India's Bold Nuclear War Plan Survive a Clash with Pakistan?

 

http://nationalinterest.org/feature/could-indias-bold-nuclear-war-plan-survive-clash-pakistan-18625?page=3

 

That garbage "No First Use" is not worth the toilet paper its written on even their new US  massa don't believe that shyt.  The fact of the matter is so long we retain the capability to put bhookas & nangas out of their misery there will be no war.  

 

They mobilized 1-Million hijras at the border and did a full fledge chakka dance demanding the hand over of 20 terrorist, that should be more than enough proof that we cut off their balls with a plutonium/uranium blade. 

 

western / Russkie weapons going to bhookas&nangas is not going to change anything.. The only concern is that western/russkie toys provided to counter balance china will be used against Pak and we should be well prepared.

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https://www.belfercenter.org/sites/default/files/files/publication/India%27s%20Nuclear%20Exceptionalism.pdf

 

 


India’s Nuclear Exceptionalism s.gif   May 4, 2017 dotted.jpg

 

By Mansoor Ahmed

s.gif       COVER.jpgIn this Project on Managing the Atom Discussion Paper, Mansoor Ahmed examines India’s fissile material production capacity and the military potential of its unsafeguarded nuclear fuel cycle and energy program. The paper details India’s existing nuclear arsenal and its potential for expansion, with a focus on three key areas, namely:
  • The principles governing the separation of India’s civil and military fuel cycle facilities;
  • The size and weapons potential of India’s existing unsafeguarded stocks of weapons-grade highly enriched uranium and plutonium as well as its unsafeguarded stockpile of reactor-grade plutonium (maintained as a “strategic reserve” and as fuel for India’s fast breeder program); and
  • The fissile material production capacity of its reactor fleet, its existing and planned reprocessing facilities, and growing uranium enrichment program. 
The paper suggests that India’s existing and future nuclear capability fuels regional security anxieties with Pakistan and impedes progress on the early conclusion of a Fissile Material Cut-off Treaty. Dr. Ahmed offers policy recommendations for managing the South Asian fissile material conundrum and calls for a transparent and verifiable separation of civil and military fuel cycle and reactor programs in India and beyond. 

Read more >> s.gif   s.gifdotted.jpg

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Posted · Report post

 

This is exactly the PR magic I have always wondered about. The true difference in potential for weapons between India and Pakistan is at least an order of magnitude in India's favor; however, you always see that FAS stupid number saying the Pakistan has 110 - 130 nukes and India has 90 - 110. The number is artificially depressed to make India look like the country that is the nuclear underdog. 

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