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Pakistan Missile tests related news

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1317 replies to this topic

#1
SyedA

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news only goes here

#2
Usman S.

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Shaheen-II test-flight before Eid

From Shaiq Hussain
ISLAMABAD - Pakistan will test-fire its long-range nuclear capable missile Shaheen-II before Eid whereas another ballistic missile Ghaznavi (Hataf-III) will be tested soon after this upcoming Islamic festival.
According to official sources, the Shaheen-II, which has the range of 2,000 kms and can carry nuclear and conventional warheads, will be test-fired a couple of days before Eid.
They said that it will be the second test of Shaheen missile as its first test was carried out early this year. The media reports which appeared in the aftermath of that test said the missile was a two-stage rocket weighing 25 tons with a diameter of 1.4 meters, a length of 17.5 meters, and a range of 2000 kilometers.
According to an official source, the range of Shaheen missile can be extended up to 2500 kms. According to him, some technical difficulties confronted by country’s scientists and engineers during its first test have been successfully overcome.
The Ghaznavi missile has the range of 290 kms and it can also carry nuclear warheads. Its first test was carried out back in 1992. However, its fresh test, likely to take place soon after Eid, will be that of its extended range which will be up to 320 kms. It has been named as Ghaznavi (ER).
Both Islamabad and New Delhi have conducted tests of their various ballistic missiles in the recent past due to technical requirements. However, they had informed each other in advance about their tests and will continue to do so in future as well, said the sources.
They said that fresh tests of ballistic missiles on the part of Islamabad will not damage the ties between the South Asian nuclear states which are currently engaged in the dialogue aimed at normalization of ties.

http://www.nation.co...4/3/index10.php

There is a special Providence in the fall of a sparrow, if it be now, "tis not to come, if it be not to come, it will be now; if it be now, yet it will come, the readiness is all. [Hamlet]


#3
aslam u

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Salaam

Is it true that range of Shaheen missile can be extended to 5000KM. I read it in newspaper few days back.......

Umair
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#4
Naveed

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Every one is waiting for the" Majestic Test" of cruise missile as mentioned in Aroosa's post few months ago.....any word on that??? :confused:

#5
Usman S.

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Every one is waiting for the" Majestic Test" of cruise missile as mentioned in Aroosa's post few months ago.....any word on that??? :confused:


Run a search. For example http://www.pakdef.in...389&postcount=8 http://www.pakdef.in...ighlight=cruise and http://www.pakdef.in...7&postcount=147

There is a special Providence in the fall of a sparrow, if it be now, "tis not to come, if it be not to come, it will be now; if it be now, yet it will come, the readiness is all. [Hamlet]


#6
Abbas Naqvi

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i read in nawa-e-waqt lately abt the cruise being tested somewhere in december 2004.


Abbas.

#7
Naveed

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Aoa to all:

Here is the latest news on upcoming missile test(s).

http://www.nation.co.../28/index15.php

But still no updates on cruise missile test ???

Naveed

#8
orko_8

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Test fire of Hatf-III (Ghaznavi) took place today. Pakistan had announced that a test fire of Hatf-VI (Shaheen-II) was to take place before Eid. Any news regarding to this test?

News report about the Hatf-III test:

http://news.bbc.co.u...sia/4050699.stm
Arda Mevlutoglu

#9
BasitS

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So was this the much awaited "majestic" test ?

#10
Usman S.

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So was this the much awaited "majestic" test ?


That is going to be a cruise missile - search the forum.

There is a special Providence in the fall of a sparrow, if it be now, "tis not to come, if it be not to come, it will be now; if it be now, yet it will come, the readiness is all. [Hamlet]


#11
Naveed

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Aoa:

Here India goes again with Akaash Missile test... tit for tat....

PAKISTANI CRUISE MISSILE test should take place ......

#12
Rasheed

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Wednesday December 8, 2:39 AM
Pakistan set to test-fire medium-range missile

(Kyodo) _ Pakistan plans to test-fire a medium-range ballistic missile within the next 48 hours to verify certain parameters of its missile system, a Defense Ministry spokesman said Tuesday night.
Maj. Gen. Shaukat Sultan told Kyodo News that Pakistan has informed all the neighboring states of the plan to carry out the missile test. However, he declined to say if the missile belongs to the Ghauri or Shaheen series of medium-range missiles.

Pakistan's missile program provides for two versions of its medium-range missiles, namely Ghauri and Shaheen to boost its defense.

Pakistan successfully test-fired a short range, nuclear-capable Ghaznavi missile on Nov. 28.

#13
Naveed

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Official sources say more tests... in coming days....any hypothetical idea on up-coming test?

#14
Shaheen

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Shaheen 1 (Hatf - IV) successfully fired today.

http://www.jang.com....update.shtml#03

Pakistan successfully test- fires nuclear capable missile Hataf- IV
(Updated at 0930 PST) By Mazhar Tufail
ISLAMABAD: Pakistan successfully test fired Hataf-IV Shaheen-I on Wednesday. Hataf-IV, Shaheen-I surface to surface missile having a range of 700 kilometers can carry all types of warheads.

President Pervaiz Musharraf and Prime Minister Shaukat Aziz have congratulated the team and nation on successful test.
Shaheen ka jahan aur hay, Kargas ka jahan aur!

#15
RMS Azam

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The latest two tests of the Ghaznavi and Shaheen-1 were to test the ability of the missile to deliver the warhead on target as well as for the warhead detonators to detonate on time. Both were successful, detonating over the target within 50 metres. An extended range version of the Shaheen-2 is also ready for flight-testing and the government has agreed in principle to test the missile but has to decide the exact timing. According to what I know, it is the Foreign and Defence Ministries that have requested the government to withold the testing of Shaheen-2. The Foreign Ministry because of the goodwill that Pakistan is currently enjoying, the Defence Ministry because of the F-16 issue.

#16
Shaheen

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"The F-16 issue" :rolleyes:

And if it has not occurred to the geniuses in foreign ministry, the best time for these tests is WHEN you are enjoying the goodwill. It's not even a new missile changing any balance or whatever, it would just be a further test of a system already been tested.
Shaheen ka jahan aur hay, Kargas ka jahan aur!

#17
Gul Khan

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"The F-16 issue" :rolleyes:

And if it has not occurred to the geniuses in foreign ministry, the best time for these tests is WHEN you are enjoying the goodwill. It's not even a new missile changing any balance or whatever, it would just be a further test of a system already been tested.


I am sure the ministery took all aspects into consideration before pushing the button, If it was me I would proceed with the test.... The message is simple, the less we depend on conventional weapons the more we depend on missiles and nukes.....

#18
Naveed

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Dear Members:

This thread needs to be feeded in .... no news on Pak missiles ? ?

#19
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--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Missile defense: what role in era of terror?

As a multibillion dollar program pushes ahead, supporters argue that the complex shield is more needed than ever.

By Brad Knickerbocker | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor

In an age when weapons of mass destruction can be slipped into the United States in a cargo container or even a suitcase, is Ronald Reagan's 1983 dream of building an umbrella against long-range enemy missiles passé? Or is it a necessary screen against the possibility of North Korea or another rogue state tossing a nuclear-tipped rocket our way?
As the US moves ahead with testing and deployment of the system, new questions are swirling about the merits of pursuing such a costly program in a time of war and increased demand for defense dollars.

The debate comes amid enduring skepticism about the technological feasibility of erecting an effective shield. In December, the US missile defense program suffered another test failure when the rocket carrying the "kill vehicle" meant to destroy an incoming mock enemy warhead shut down before launch from the Kwajalein Atoll in the Pacific Ocean.

Pentagon officials, who attributed it to an "unknown anomaly," downplayed the failure. But critics point out it is part of a pattern - four of the system's nine major tests have been unsuccessful.

Yet the Bush administration doggedly keeps pushing the program. The administration has steadily increased funding for missile defense, although the Pentagon may trim that in coming years in order to pay for the expensive ground wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. And it's pushed ahead with deployment in Alaska and California even though some experts say key components are far from finished.

Early in his first term, Mr. Bush also pulled the US out of the 1972 Antiballistic Missile Treaty. The ABM Treaty restricted such defenses on the theory that this would slow down the nuclear arms race by maintaining a kind of standoff known as "mutual assured destruction."

Technology pushes the pace

The geopolitical landscape and the threat environment are very different from when Mr. Reagan launched his Strategic Defense Initiative (quickly dubbed "star wars"), startling allied nations as well as potential adversaries.

"Missile defense is gradually outgrowing the ideological disputes of the past," says national security analyst Loren Thompson of the Lexington Institute in Arlington, Va. The threat has become more diverse and less predictable, he says. At the same time, he adds, having to deal with a handful of relatively primitive weapons from a few rogue states, rather than masses of multiwarhead missiles from the former Soviet Union, means "this mission looks doable."

"The scale of likely threats is so modest that even the thin defense being built in Alaska and California may be sufficient to dissuade some problem-states from pursuing long-range ballistic missiles," says Dr. Thompson.

Others see an even greater need.

"China has developed a whole new generation of mobile ICBMs capable of hitting the US," says Baker Spring, a national security analyst at the Heritage Foundation in Washington. "And hostile governments, such as North Korea and Iran, continue to develop and produce ballistic missiles capable of inflicting real damage upon American soil."

Failure to counter such threats militarily, some advocates say, could undercut this country's military and diplomatic position in a dangerous world. Sen. Jon Kyl ® of Arizona, a leading congressional proponent of missile defense, warns of "blackmail intended to freeze us into inaction by the very threat of missile attack."

Mistakes made in battle

No one underestimates the difficulty of "hitting a bullet with a bullet," which describes the technological challenge of missile defense, especially when split-second decisions need to be made during the fog of war.

As the invasion to oust the regime of Saddam Hussein got under way in March 2003, shorter-range US Patriot missiles nailed several Iraqi rockets headed for advancing coalition forces. But Patriots also mistakenly shot down a US Navy jet and a British fighter, killing the allied pilots. And countering ICBMs, which can reach US targets from halfway around the world in just 30 minutes, is far tougher - especially if an attacker also launches a bunch of decoys, as expected.

Critics liken the rush to deploy expensive ballistic missile defenses at a time when the threat as well as technology is changing to rewriting architectural plans in the middle of building a house. And they say the nine tests so far (five of which succeeded) were set up - "rigged," some say - to virtually assure success.

"A system is being deployed that certainly doesn't have any credible capability," says retired Air Force Gen. Eugene Habiger, former head of the Strategic Command, which includes all US nuclear forces. "I cannot recall any military system being deployed in such a manner."

Other critics point out that the system being deployed in Alaska and California lacks certain crucial elements, including the necessary radar, the proper satellite constellations, and the ability of the "kill vehicle" interceptors to discriminate between potential targets at a closure rate of more than 15,000 miles per hour.

"This is like deploying a new military jet fighter with no wings, no tail, and no landing gear," says Philip Coyle, the Pentagon's former head of weapons testing, now an adviser to the private Center for Defense Information in Washington.

Weapons proliferate worldwide

Whether the administration's relative optimism about the potential for a US missile-defense system will continue to apply to this country's old communist adversary is another matter. Russian military officials announced earlier this year that they are developing a "revolutionary" intercontinental weapon. Rather than being ballistic (unpowered once it's left the booster rocket), this new type of warhead would be powered by a supersonic combustion ramjet allowing it to maneuver to the target.

This design may be as untested as the more fanciful aspects of star wars, such as space-based lasers.

But even proponents of ballistic missile defense say there are other things to worry about. The Bush administration, says missile defense supporter Thompson at the Lexington Institute, "has been nearly blind" to the danger of low-flying cruise missiles proliferating around the world. According to the Pentagon, nine countries will be producing land-attack cruise missiles over the next 10 years, many of them for export.

"The nation needs a balanced defensive posture, which means taking the growing cruise-missile danger seriously, even as we move to counter the more visible threat of ballistic missiles," says Thompson

#20
Guest_taimur khaliq_*

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excerpts from Indian press

However, he added, a word of caution that unless the developed system was globally competitive, the move to export could boomerang.

Optimistic of India’s future in the field of missile technology, Saraswat said India had made huge gains in the field of missile technology. ‘‘The technological gap between the Western countries and India has been bridged to a great extent,’’ he revealed. He went on to add that not only was the country at par with many western countries in navigation technology, it was, in fact, better than many others in the field of simulation and software.

The one field where the country needed to stress was in the production of numbers. According to the Research Centre Imarat Director, this too had a solution, which lay in integrating the elements of Information Technology, nano-technology and biomolecular technology.

While IT has made inroads in defence systems, nano-technology and bio-molecular tech would miniaturise the technology leading to leaner and meaner weapons.

For this purpose, the DRDO is developing hypersonic technology that could see missiles which would travel at speeds ten times that of sound. This, however, would require development of special engines and materials for the missile as well as use of a fuel that would sustain such high speeds. The DRDO is, thus, developing scramjet engines that would have the ability to sustain such conditions. There is also the ongoing development of a hyperplane system for the proposed hypersonic missile.

The future missile: Sleeker, leaner, meaner

Express News Service

Sleeker, leaner and meaner missiles are going to be made in the future in India. This was the import of the presentation made by Padamashree Dr. V.K. Saraswat, Director of the Research Centre Imarat, Hyderabad, at the Chitkata Institute of Engineering and Technology, here. The presentation is a part of the lecture series being conducted by Punjab Technical University (PTU). Speaking to students and faculty at the Institute, the chief guest stressed on the need for a paradigm shift in developing the missile system in the country. He called for greater integration of industries with the acadaemia, researchers and users of missile technology. He envisaged a time where the government would propose and the industry would deliver the goods. He elaborated that the stress now was on developing missiles that will have a low payload, but high precision. This he said was aimed at minimising collateral damage.

Waxing eloquent on the topic of ‘Contemporary Technology Management and Technology Transfer in Integrated Missile Systems’, Saraswat told the audience about the history of missile systems indigenous to the country and told how India had made tremendous advances in the last decade. He called upon the Western nations’ ban on exporting missile technology and components to India, a blessing in disguise. He explained that the country’s march towards self-reliance was a result of the erstwhile global ostracism. The distinguished scientist explained that given India’s geographical position and the rapidity with which its neighbours were developing missile capabilities, the country faced threats of missile strikes from all directions. Ensuring that the country was not a sitting duck for any trigger-happy nation, the DRDO and other research organisations, he said, are aiming at developing smarter weapons




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