Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Christian Jihad

5 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

Was the Taliban right about the real agenda of aid workers Heather Mercer and Dayna Curry?

By Deborah Caldwell

When the Taliban captured humanitarian relief workers Dayna Curry and Heather Mercer in August, religious and political leaders in the United States were aghast. The Taliban accused the aid workers of being on a secret campaign to convert Muslims. It seemed yet another sign of the Taliban's dishonesty, extremism and paranoia.

But now that Curry and Mercer and the six other Shelter Now relief workers are safe, a different story can be told. The Taliban was partly right. Curry and Mercer did spend time in Afghanistan evangelizing--in violation of Afghani law. More significantly, they are part of a widespread and rapidly growing effort among American Christians to convert Muslims around the world.

They are warriors, in other words, in what can fairly be described as a Christian jihad against Islam.

Although the two women say that most of their time was spent providing practical humanitarian care, Curry has conceded that about 20% of the Taliban's charges against them were valid. She admits, for instance, that she gave a boy a book about Jesus, and that she and Mercer showed at least one Afghani family a movie known as "the Jesus" film. The Jesus film is a popular tool of missionaries seeking converts. Translated into 685 languages, the 1979 film was made for $2 million by Campus Crusade for Christ founder Bill Bright with the financial backing of conservative oilman Nelson "Bunker" Hunt.

It is not particularly surprising that Curry and Mercer did a bit of proselytizing while there. The church where they are members regularly sponsors misisonaries in foreign countries to "introduce people to God and see them 'discipled' as followers of Christ,” says Jeff Abshire, pastor of Antioch Community Church in Waco, Texas.

The group that sponsored the women, Shelter Now, is part of a larger network of evangelical Christians that has sprung up in the last decade to target Muslims for conversion to Christianity. Since 1990, the number of missionaries in Islamic countries has quadrupled. Mission experts estimate they have spoken to or given Christian material to about 334 million people in that time. Franklin Graham's assertion last week that Islam is "wicked, violent, and not of the same God" also flows from this movement.

Groups such as Youth With a Mission and the Southern Baptist Convention's International Mission Board, sponsor two-week jaunts to places like Kyrgyzstan to convert Muslims to Christianity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

I don't doubt these people had other motives. Chritianity and Islam both have strong evangelical traditions. My only point is that we are free to preach and convert people in their societies... and do, quite successfully in fact. If they come to our part of the world and do the same, so what? Islam has consistently done better than Christianity on this score. We need to worry about many things, but not this.

If your argument is that their media is biased and not always to be believed, I would agree. It is biased. One of the positive aspects of this war has been that CNN has lost an awful lot of credibility in our part of the world, whereas Al-Jazeera has clearly gained. Good. Let's have more Al-Jazeerah's. But let's also not forget that not long ago, Al-Jazeera was considered a CIA creation also, since it criticised Arab regimes lack of transparency and honesty. Actually, it is "free"... but from an Arab Muslim perspective, whereas CNN is "free" but from an American perspective. Ultimately, there is no complete "objectivity". Our objectivity may vary from theirs. But for us to believe our media (as in the case of Al-Jazeerah), it is important that WE believe that WE are seeing a view that is honest and representative of US... rather than a State sponsored view, which is what has failed us in the past.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Originally posted by fameen

My only point is that we are free to preach and convert people in their societies... and do, quite successfully in fact. If they come to our part of the world and do the same, so what? Islam has consistently done better than Christianity on this score. We need to worry about many things, but not this.

It all depends where are you preaching. As far as the western Christian countries are concerned, their value system, separation of Church and State along with free expression of ideas and ideology erects no hurdles in preaching of other religions. This is their law of land.

Where as in a Muslim country or even a non-Muslim country (China, Cuba, etc) if the law of the land implies that no other religion except the state religion or ideology can be preached than it should be respected.

It is basically the law of the land one should respect not that Islaam is in danger or Christianity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

As far as I know, all activity designed to get people to change their religion is against the law in Pakistan. This does not apply just to non-Muslims, even Muslims are prohibited from trying to convert non-Muslims. The rationale is to prevent provocations and maintain religious harmony in the country. This was the situation back in 1970s, I don't know whether this is still the case.

NavBaby.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

Abbas,

I did go back and read the constitution of Pakistan (1973) and found the following.

Chapter I -Fundamental Rights

20.

Subject to law, public order and morality:-

(a) every citizen shall have the right to profess, practise and propagate his religion; and

(B) every religious denomination and every sect thereof shall have the right to establish, maintain and manage its religious institutions.

21.

No person shall be compelled to pay any special tax the proceeds of which are to be spent on the propagation or maintenance of any religion other than his own.

22.

(1) No person attending any educational institution shall be required to receive religious instruc tion, or take part in any religious ceremony, or attend religious worship, if such instruction, ceremony or worship relates to a religion other than his own.

(2) In respect of any religious institution, there shall be no discrimination against any community in the granting of exemption or concession in relation to taxation.

(3) Subject to law:

(a) no religious community or denomination shall be prevented from providing religious instruction for pupils of that community or denomination in any educational institution maintained wholly by that community or denomination; and

(B) no citizen shall be denied admission to any educational institution receiving aid from public revenues on the ground only of race, religion, caste or place of birth.

(4) Nothing in this Article shall prevent any public authority from making provision for the advancement of any socially or educationally backward class of citizens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0