Pakistan Navy News - 2016

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This thread is for news only - any other post will be deleted without warning. For any discussion, kindly use the relevant thread on the main forum. Old thread is here:
 

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Footprints: Sea sick, are we?
SHAZIA HASAN — UPDATED ABOUT 13 HOURS AGO
      
Special Services Group (Navy) commandos display a HVBSS manoeuvre to overpower pirates on board the F-22P frigate PNS Zulfiquar.—Photo by writer
 
 
ON BOARD PNS ZULFIQUAR: The dot in the distance starts taking the shape of a speedboat as it approaches the ship en route to Balochistan. On the bridge of the F-22P frigate PNS Zulfiquar, Pakistan Navy officers are trying to make contact with it but to no avail; the boat chooses to ignore the signals. Left with no choice, the captain of the ship orders to engage fire which proves helpful in deterring the approaching vessel. It changes direction and vanishes for a while only to reappear after a few minutes from another direction.
 
That’s when the missiles on the ship are aimed at it. Following some action and excitement you hear the word ‘splash’ meaning the speedboat is in clear target and would be sunk in a few seconds.
 
The speedboat in this case is PNS Zarrar and no, the 33-metre-long Multi-Role Tactical Platform (MRTP33) hasn’t really been sunk by the warship. This is just a drill being carried out on Tuesday to show how naval ships defend themselves against approaching threats.
 
The sea, the most economical route for trade, is under constant threat from smugglers and pirates. PNS Zulfiquar then, playing the role of a defenceless merchant ship, becomes part of a Helicopter Visit, Board, Search and Seizure (HVBSS) demonstration where special force boats patrol around the ship in trouble as Special Services Group (Navy) commandos drop down on the deck from the American twin-engine anti-submarine warfare Sea King helicopter, to search the ship and capture the unwelcome visitors. More excitement follows as the Chinese Harbin Z-9 helicopter, part of the Pakistan Navy’s Air Arm, demonstrates several landings and take-offs from PNS Zulfiquar.
 
But the manoeuvre drills, no doubt impressive, do not provide answers to the several scathing questions regarding the meagre allocation of budget for the Pakistan Navy. As India concentrates on building a blue-water navy, acquiring more warships, aircraft carriers and nuclear submarines to build up its fleet and exercise sea control at wide ranges, the Pakistan Navy with only a per cent of the defence budget to its name, even struggles to run its day-to-day operations.
 
Till the 1960s Pakistan had a lively ship-making industry thanks to the Karachi Shipyard but as Commander Pakistan Fleet Vice Admiral Syed Arifullah Hussaini rightly points out, a shipyard requires constant upgrading for it to remain relevant. “Our shipyard was revived by the Pakistan Navy some 10 years ago and putting it back on the right track also helped the Pakistan National Shipping Corporation,” says Vice Admiral Hussaini.
 
He adds, “To run a shipyard you need to run it like the corporate sector. The Karachi Shipyard stood on its own legs after it got the Navy’s contract for building destroyers. We want shipbuilding to progress here but even though the Karachi Shipyard is doing better, it is not deep enough to build bigger sea vessels. A shipyard at Gwadar Port and Port Qasim would have more scope. For years and years everything to do with prosperity has been linked to shipping and the sea.”
 
Apart from the nine Pakistan Merchant Navy carriers, the country relies on foreign flag carriers for trade purposes but the foreign ships may or may not carry the cargo in war-like situations. Therefore, Pakistan also needs to build on its merchant navy fleet.
 
The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), a $46 billion mega project, with a 3,000-kilometre network of roads, railways and oil and gas pipelines from Gwadar Port to Kashgar city in China, has the potential to change the face of Pakistan as it becomes the biggest recipient of China’s outbound investment. But what about the safety of the maritime silk route, the passage from where the ships would reach Gwadar Port?
 
Navy’s Director Public Relations North Commander Zakir Hussain Khan, also on board PNS Zulfiquar for the exercise drills, wonders if the Navy would be in a position to provide the security needed for the kind of sea traffic expected in the region by 2020.
 
“Although the Pakistan Navy doesn’t want to get into the arms race, we want credible deterrence. We want to be able to guard our national interests,” says the Commander Naval Fleet.
 
Still, looking at the Navy’s budget as compared to the amount being spent on developing land infrastructure makes one wonder if the government is biased against the sea.
 
Published in Dawn, January 8th, 2016
 

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Pioneering women: Defying stereotypes
TAUSEEF RAZI MALLICK — UPDATED 15 MINUTES AGO
 
Lieutenant Zakia Jamali -Photo provided by the writer
 
At the time she joined the Pakistan Navy, Lieutenant Zakia Jamali had little idea of the direction her career would take. The only female commissioned naval officer from the province, the possibility of belonging to the navy’s elite seemed like a far-fetched idea for a young girl who grew up in Balochistan’s Jaffarabad district.
 
For Lt Jamali this is a childhood dream come true as she had always been fascinated with the armed forces. “I did my intermediate with science subjects only to join the military but I was rejected by the Pakistan Air Force for being short in height,” she recalls.
 
However, the naval officer, who had been brought up to face all challenges in life head on, didn’t give up her dreams and instead applied to the navy at a later stage. Lt Jamali attributes her strong headedness to her father, Niaz Mohammad Jamali, a pioneering educationist in the ’70s in her hometown.
 
Balochistan’s first female commissioned naval officer says she was able to achieve her dreams due to the support of Baloch society and her father
Lt Jamali’s father encouraged her and her four sisters to be well-educated — her other siblings now teach at government institutions, a career path Lt Jamali also initially opted for. After completing her Master’s in Urdu literature from Balochistan University, Quetta, she joined Usta Mohammad High School as an Urdu teacher. But her life took a different turn when Lt Jamali came across an advertisement about openings in the Pakistan Navy. “When the navy announced a vacancy for someone with a Master’s in Urdu, I applied immediately,” she says.
 
Lt Jamali says her journey to join the Naval Academy was nerve-racking; not because the selection process was tough but because her mother was suffering from cancer at that time, and it was hard to juggle all that was demanded of her.
 
The day she was called for her entrance test from the Inter-Services Selection Board, her mother went into a coma. When she regained consciousness after three days, Lt Jamali showed her the letter: “My mother was half conscious […] with a nod she gave me permission to pursue my desire”.
 
Lt Jamali states that women are held in such high esteem in the Baloch community that if a man being questioned in a jirga over a family dispute swears by his daughters, he is granted some form of respite or is even forgiven.
Sadly, Lt Jamali’s mother didn’t get to see her daughter fulfil her lifelong dream; the newly recruited cadet was just 20 days into her training at the Pakistan Naval Academy when her mother died.
 
“Both back at the village and here at the academy everyone believed that I won’t be able to continue my training, as it might take me some time to recover from the grave loss. But I returned to the academy and continued with my training. This earned me a lot of respect in the eyes of my seniors at the academy and the force, which I enjoy till today,” says the officer.
 
Lt Jamali was commissioned into the education branch of the Pakistan Navy as a sub-lieutenant in 2012 and has been teaching at the Cadet College in Ormara. Recently, she was promoted to the rank of lieutenant — a post she relishes. “During the final interview, the board had asked me whether I’d be comfortable working in Ormara or not. I told them I am a Baloch and Balochistan is my province, I will be more than happy to work there.”
 
Lt Jamali further points out that the rest of the country’s perception of girls’ education not being a top priority for the Baloch is completely wrong; in fact, it’s just the opposite. “In Naseerabad, Jhal magsi and other districts, educating girls is a preference and my sisters are an example of that,” she adds.
 
Baloch society, she says, respects women and values their opinion. “If a boy demands something, chances are that his family might turn him down. But if those demands are made by a girl, her family will do everything to fulfil them,” emphasises Lt Jamali. “This is the level of importance the Baloch give to their women.”
 
Lt Jamali states that women are held in such high esteem in the Baloch community that if a man being questioned in a jirga over a family dispute swears by his daughters, he is granted some form of respite or is even forgiven.
 
She feels that Baloch need to realise how important their province has become in recent years and how they can benefit from its geo-political importance. “The Baloch have a separate identity which must be respected but Pakistan is incomplete without Balochistan and vice versa.”
 
And Lt Jamali is still as passionate about literature as she was when she first decided to study it. Fond of Ghalib, Iqbal and Jaun Alia’s poetry, she says that she is drawn to “their innovation and the ability to preach new ideas through poetry”. While she likes Qurratulain Hyder’s work when it comes to Urdu prose, she also reads Baloch literature, and is inspired by the writings of Atta Shad and Danyal Tareen.
 
Well-read, vocal about her opinions and ambitious, Lt. Jamali clearly has a great career ahead of her. So what does she think about her achievements so far? “It was a unique honour that I was set to bring to my family and native town,” she says matter-of-factly.
 
Published in Dawn, Sunday Magazine, April 24th, 2016
 
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KSEW cuts steel on Pakistan's first MPV, as new details emerge

 

Record Infohide

Publication

Jane's Navy International

Author

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore

 

Countries

China

Pakistan

Date posted

04-05-2016

 

KSEW has begun building the first of six MPVs for the Pakistan Maritime Security Agency

The vessels will replace the Barkat-class patrol boats that have been in service since the late 1980s

Pakistan's state-owned shipbuilder Karachi Shipyard and Engineering Works (KSEW) has held a steel-cutting ceremony for the first of six maritime patrol vessels (MPVs) on order for the Pakistan Maritime Security Agency (PMSA).

New details on Pakistan's capability requirements for the vessels have also emerged.

The steel-cutting ceremony was held on 3 May and was attended by senior officials from the Pakistan Navy, KSEW, and China Shipbuilding Trading Company (CSTC).

The steel-cutting ceremony for the first of six MPVs on order for the Pakistan Maritime Security Agency. A backdrop image used at the ceremony provides some design details of the platform.

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The steel-cutting ceremony for the first of six MPVs on order for the Pakistan Maritime Security Agency. A backdrop image used at the ceremony provides some design details of the platform. (Pakistan Armed Forces Inter Services Public Relations)

The MPVs, each displacing 600 tonnes at full load, are being constructed under a transfer-of-technology arrangement signed between KSEW and CSTC in June 2015. KSEW will construct two vessels in Pakistan while the remaining four will be built by CSTC in China.

No further details on the vessels were provided by KSEW in its media release for the ceremony; the company also declined an interview request from IHS Jane's on 4 May, citing confidentiality issues.

However, a tender document on the MPV programme, published by the Pakistani government's planning commission, revealed a requirement for a platform that can attain a maximum speed of 30 kt and a cruising speed of between 12-16 kt. The vessel should also have a standard range of 4,500 n miles at cruising speed, and have an endurance of 21 days at sea without replenishment.

Armament to be fitted onboard includes either a 37 mm or a 30 mm gun as a primary weapon, in addition to mountings for two 12.7 mm machine guns.

An artist's illustration of the MPV, shown at the ceremony, suggests that the PMSA has opted for an automatic stabilised naval gun system as the platform's main weapon.

The illustration also suggests that the platform can accommodate a single helicopter on its flight deck on top of two rigid-hull inflatable boats at the stern section.

COMMENT

The PMSA is an independent service of the armed forces, but relies on the Pakistan Navy for manning and support. According to a statement published in the tender document relating to the acquisition of the six MPVs, the PMSA's current fleet comprises four Chinese-built Barkat-class patrol boats that were commissioned between December 1989 and June 1990. The Barkat-class vessels were described in the document as having "outlived their life [with] recurring defects [that] have been hampering [the] PMSA to pursue its assigned roles and tasks."

 

Upon commissioning, the MPVs are expected to take on exclusive economic zone protection, counter-smuggling, and search-and-rescue duties.   

 

 

 Apparently these are replacing for the cancelled order of eight GRC43M Cutters ordered from the US. They are almost identical in the specifications.

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Pakistan Navy holds biennial war games
THE NEWSPAPER'S STAFF REPORTER — UPDATED ABOUT 9 HOURS AGO
 
 
Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral Muhammad Zakaullah and General Rashad Mehmood, Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee in a group photograph during opening session of Shamsheer-i-Bahr VI, Pakistan Navy biennial war games. ─APP
 
KARACHI: Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee General Rashad Mahmood said on Monday that with the operationalisation of China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) and Gwadar Port the responsibilities of Pakistan Navy would increase manyfold.
 
Speaking at the opening session of the Pakistan Navy’s biennial war games, Shamsheer-i-Bahr VI on Monday, he said he expected exercises to meet such challenges would be included in the conduct of the war games.
 
Underlining the significance of war games in the military planning process, Gen Rashad said currently the world was volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous so regular conducting of war games to evolve new concepts and doctrines was important. He lauded the realistic threat appraisal, exhaustive planning process and objective analysis presented by the force commanders.
 
Earlier, deputy chief of naval staff (operations) Vice Admiral Zafar Abbasi presented an overview of the war game outlining objectives set forth, and concepts to be tried. He highlighted the importance of ensuing impregnable seaward defence and the vital role of Pakistan Navy in the face of emerging challenges.
 
He said that being a tri-service event with representation from relevant ministries, Shamsheer-i-Bahr VI was a biennial exercise to try out various concepts which are then validated in subsequent navy-wide field exercises before being incorporated into naval strategy.
 
Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Muhammad Zakaullah was also present.
 
Published in Dawn, July 26th, 2016
 

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PM Nawaz launches 17,000-tonne Pakistan Navy Warship fleet tanker at Karachi Shipyard
DAWN.COM — PUBLISHED ABOUT 2 HOURS AGO
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KARACHI: Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif on Friday launched a 17,000-tonne heavy Pakistan Navy Warship fleet tanker, at the Karachi Shipyard.
 
The fleet tanker was built in collaboration with Turkish firm Savunma Teknologiler Muhendisilik (STM). The design of the fleet tanker was prepared by Turkey and executed in the Karachi Shipyard.
 
The prime minister, who is in the metropolis for a series of meetings today, expressed hope that Pakistan would continue to collaborate with the Turkish government and businesses to build more ships at the Karachi Shipyard.
 
The premier congratulated the Ministry of Defence Production, the Pakistan Navy, STM, and the Karachi Shipyard for completing the project ahead of time.
 
PM Nawaz said the fleet tanker would be remembered as a symbol of 'time-tested' Pakistan-Turkey friendship.
 

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Turkish-made military tanker ship joins Pakistan navy

 

Built for the Pakistan Navy by primary contractor Defense Industries Engineering Inc. (STM), the Pakistan Navy Fleet Tanker is the biggest one-time warship export from Turkey's defense industry, making its maiden voyage in a ceremony organized to honor Pakistan's independence. The inaugural ceremony for the Fleet Tanker was attended by Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, Undersecretary of Defense Industries İsmail Demir and STM General Manager Davut Yılmaz, along with military officials from both countries. Speaking at the ceremony, Prime Minister Sharif said that Pakistan's collaboration with Turkey will continue, and hoped that more ships will be built in the future. Expressing his thanks to the institutions and organizations that contributed in the project, Sharif said that the Pakistan Navy Fleet Tanker will symbolize the fellowship between Pakistan and Turkey. Acknowledging the geographical distance between the two countries, the Pakistani prime minister said that Turkey and Pakistan have close ties thanks to sharing common interests, civilizations and sharing similar fates. Sharif went on to say that the construction of the fleet tanker opened the door for future collaboration between Turkey and Pakistan in the field of battleship construction, and the improvement of defense product quality. "Pakistan is aware of the crucial role of the establishment of the shipbuilding industry in the country's economic growth and creation of job opportunities. The improvement of this industry will make significant contributions to the country's economy."
 
Stressing that the fleet tanker project is a success story for the two countries, Undersecretary Demir said Turkey and Pakistan need more cooperation and collaborations considering today's security concerns, adding that collaboration in the defense industry matters more in this time of unstable environment, as both countries are facing increasing terrorist threats. Recalling the visit of a delegation from Pakistan's Parliament on Aug. 18 to show their support, Demir said that Turkey is aware of Pakistan's support and is appreciative, stressing that Turkey will stand by Pakistan during tough times.
 
Stating that the collaboration between Turkey and Pakistan in the defense industry has recently gained momentum, Demir said some high-level contacts had been made between the two countries in defense contracts; with the Pakistan Navy Fleet Tanker being the first of these contracts. "This tanker will surely operate for 30 to 40 years, and it will be the first of many projects to be conducted between the two countries in this field. Their collaboration is a good example of the win-win approach," Demir said.
 
Pointing out that low-cost projects which involved technology transfer, capacity-sharing and common production features, despite differences between the two countries' technologies, approaches and relations, Demir said many other projects would be carried out for the navy as well as military, land forces, and air forces. He added that the fighter jet development program is open to Pakistanis and jointly-built Turkish-Pakistani fighter jets are likely to fly in coming years.
 
Serving as a first in the shipbuilding industry between Pakistan and Turkey, the project is noteworthy for the exemplary and original collaboration efforts in the defense and the shipbuilding industry.
 
Making a breakthrough in the construction of warships, the Turkish shipbuilding industry has manufactured byproducts in this field, as well as designing and engineering services. Twenty Turkish firms took part in the project. The Fleet Tanker, which cost approximately $90 million, will be the biggest ship in Pakistan's naval history. Designed for the Pakistan Navy, the Fleet Tanker weighs 15,600 tons with an approximate length of 155 meters. Reaching speeds of up to 20 knots, the tanker has a replenishment-at-sea system (RAS/FAS) and a helicopter landing pad.
 
It is equipped with superior logistical, defense and attack capabilities, in addition to functioning as a tanker.
 
The design of the tanker was completed in Turkey, while the vessel was built in the Karachi Shipyard. The project was signed into effect on January 22, 2013 and the First Steel Cut Ceremony was conducted on Nov. 27, 2013.
 

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INAUGURAL CEREMONY OF PAKISTAN NAVAL FAST ATTACK CRAFT 3 HELD IN KARACHI
 
This modern naval ship for Pak Navy has been prepared with the cooperation of China.
 
File Photo
Inaugural ceremony of Pakistan Naval Fast Attack Craft 3 held in Karachi
12:21 PM, 17 Sep, 2016 0
 
The inaugural ceremony of Fast Attack Craft 3 of Pakistan Navy was held in Karachi on Saturday.
 
Addressing the ceremony, Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral Muhammad Zakaullah said this modern naval ship for Pak Navy has been prepared with the cooperation of China.
 
Terming it a milestone in defense and strategic cooperation between Pakistan and China, he said the attack craft would indeed provide synergy in defense of the country’s sea frontiers.
 
Naval Chief Admiral Muhammad Zakaullah says induction of new vessels would enhance operational capability of Pakistan Navy and protect the national jurisdiction and sovereignty of country's maritime zones.
 
He said presently three vessels are being constructed at Karachi Shipyard with the technical collaboration of China.
 
Naval Chief also highlighted the significance of China-Pakistan Economic Corridor for enhancing regional trade activity with Gwadar port as the focal point. He said the CPEC will be a game changer with economic dividends not only for China and Pakistan but also for the entire region.
 
Admiral Zakaullah said providing a safe and secure maritime environment is pivotal to the success of CPEC and that Pakistan Navy is fully committed to this important objective.
 
He hoped the vessels under construction will contribute significantly towards the security of Gwadar.
 

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BiG DEVELOPMENT

 

 

The commissioning ceremony of new Naval Base PNS HAMEED was held near Karachi in the coastal region of SINDH province today. The Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee (CJCSC), General Rashad Mahmood was the Chief Guest on the occasion. Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral Muhammad Zakaullah was also present in the ceremony.

 

The commissioning of PNS HAMEED is a landmark achievement for Pakistan Navy, as besides providing maritime Broadcast services for units of Pakistan Navy operating at sea, the base is fully equipped with first of the kind Very Low Frequency (VLF) transmission facility of the country. The secure military communication link in the VLF spectrum will add new dimensions by enhancing the flexibility and reach of submarine operations. The submarines when on surface are capable to transmit and receive broadcast messages however, once submerged, can only receive wireless message on VLF. The name of Unit has been ascribed after Lt Cdr Pervaiz Hameed Shaheed, the Executive officer of Ex-Ghazi Submarine.

 

While speaking on the occasion the Chief Guest, CJCSC lauded the concerted efforts of those involved and highlighted that with the commissioning of PNS HAMEED, significant operational capability has been added to the PN, which would further augment the seaward defence of country. He further added that commissioning is yet another milestone in PN’s commitment towards ensuring the defence of maritime frontiers of Pakistan.

 

Chief of the Naval Staff while appreciating the efforts of all those who have been associated with the project, said that the commissioning of PNS HAMEED in the coastal region of SINDH is a significant breakthrough towards enhancing PN’s operational capability.

 

The ceremony was attended by a large number of PN, military and local civil dignitaries. (ISPR)

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Pakistan’s participation in Turkish naval exercise appreciated
 
Commander of Turkey’s maritime force says exercise provides experience sharing opportunities for all participating navies
 
Pakistan’s participation in Turkish naval exercise appreciated
 By:   PPI 
 21-Nov-16
 
 
ISLAMABAD: A Pakistan Navy’s ship – Alamgir-FFG 260 – participated in the Multinational Maritime Exercise MAVI Balina 2016 in Aksaz Naval Base Turkey.
 
In the reception ceremony, PNS Alamgir Commander Captain Imtiaz Ali said that Pakistan and Turkey enjoy close relations as both the navies have also maintained warm and cordial relations since decades.
 
Turkish Naval Forces Fleet Commander Admiral Veysel Kösele appreciated Pakistan Navy’s active participation in Mavi Balina and said that the exercise provides an opportunity for participating navies to share experience in responding to contemporary challenges.
 

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'Pak-China naval collaboration gains more importance due to CPEC'
DAWN.COM — UPDATED about 3 hours ago
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Naval collaboration between Pakistan Navy and PLA (Navy) has become even more important in the backdrop of CPEC. —Navy PR
 
Bilateral exercises are expected to go a long way in promoting maritime security and stability in the region. —Navy PR
 
The bilateral exercise between Pakistan Navy and the Peoples Liberation Army-Navy encompassing harbour and sea phases concluded on Monday in the North Arabian Sea, said a statement issued by navy’s media wing.
 
“The deep rooted naval collaboration between Pakistan Navy and PLA (Navy) has become even more important in the backdrop of China Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), in order to effectively handle complex challenges in the maritime domain,” read the statement.
 
The sea phase of the exercise covered a wide spectrum of maritime and naval operations performed by ships, helicopters, maritime patrol aircraft, joint boarding operations by special forces, air defence exercises, communication drills and joint manoeuvres by the surface combatants.
 
While the harbour phase of the exercise comprised “various calls on, visits, sports activities and table top discussions as preparatory warm up for sea phase”, the navy’s statement added.
 
“Bilateral exercises are expected to go a long way in promoting maritime security and stability in the region.”
 
Pakistan Navy said that enhanced collaboration with PLA (Navy) is aimed at improving interoperability for conducting combined maritime operations to ensure a stable maritime environment vital for economic stability and growth as well as ensuring peace and security in the maritime commons.
 
“This exercise is reflective of the strong mutual desire to improve the level of coordination and interoperability at operational and tactical levels.”
 
583330a4bfdb5.jpg
Pakistan Navy said that enhanced collaboration with PLA (Navy) is aimed at improving interoperability. —Navy PR

 

583330a4a4954.jpg
This exercise is reflective of strong mutual desire to improve the level of coordination and interoperability at operational and tactical levels. —Navy PR

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55f6a88f801b1_14.jpg
The Tanker of the Pakistan Army to be Protected with Aselsan Systems

Aselsan will manufacture a Remote Stabilized Gun System and Communication Switch System for the Navy Fleet Tanker of Pakistan Naval Forces Command. 

Within the scope of the contract signed on 22 January 2013 between the Savunma Teknolojileri Mühendislik ve Ticaret A.Ş (STM) and Pakistan’s Ministry of Defence Production, in order to fulfil the requirements of the Pakistan Naval Forces, a Navy Fleet Tanker about 155 m in length and that displaces 15,600 tonnes is being built by Karachi Shipyard and Engineering Works (KSEW) under the charge of STM as the main contractor through the STM’s infrastructural facilities. The...
55f6a88f801b1_14.jpg
The Tanker of the Pakistan Army to be Protected with Aselsan Systems

Aselsan will manufacture a Remote Stabilized Gun System and Communication Switch System for the Navy Fleet Tanker of Pakistan Naval Forces Command. 

Within the scope of the contract signed on 22 January 2013 between the Savunma Teknolojileri Mühendislik ve Ticaret A.Ş (STM) and Pakistan’s Ministry of Defence Production, in order to fulfil the requirements of the Pakistan Naval Forces, a Navy Fleet Tanker about 155 m in length and that displaces 15,600 tonnes is being built by Karachi Shipyard and Engineering Works (KSEW) under the charge of STM as the main contractor through the STM’s infrastructural facilities. The...
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