Defence Sales, Cooperation & Production - 2015

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This thread is for news only. For discussions, kindly use one of the threads on the main forum.   

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Posted · Report post

News is Indonesia has selected selex Grifo radar to upgrade its T50 fighters.Its probably a similar sys offered for the Jf-17.

reference:Airforces monthly,January issue

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Chinese ‘Thunderbolt’ helicopters may replace American Cobras in Pakistan

Helico­pters likely to be used agains­t milita­nts in Operat­ion Khyber I and Zarb-e-Azb operat­ions

By Web Desk

Published: April 3, 2015

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PHOTO COURTESY: PopSci

In line with a January 2015 contract, Pakistan has received three Chinese Z-10 “Thunderbolt” attack helicopters to replace its American Cobra helicopter.

The helicopters having anti-tank and air-to-air mission capabilities are currently at a Pakistani Army base in Qasim/Dhamial, undergoing testing, maintenance training and modifications to be used in Operation Khyber I and Zarb-e-Azb against militants near the Pak-Afghan border.

The Z-10 would be used, as have the AH-1s, to provide close air support to Pakistani troops, as well as to conduct search and kill mission of high value terrorist targets, and battlefield survey.

PHOTO COURTESY: PopSci

The Z-10, like other modern attack helicopters, carries a range of missiles and rockets such as the HJ-10 anti-tank missile, as well as its 23mm chain gun, which can spit out about 600 8oz shells a minute. It is built by the Changhe Aircraft Industries Corporation, with design input from Russia’s Kamov Design Bureau.

The Z-10′s primary sensor is the round turret on the bottom half of its nose, which carries a variety of cameras, including night vision, electro-optical and infrared imaging.

With its heavy armament of a 23mm cannon, and over a tonne of guided weapons including HJ-10 anti-tank missiles, 57mm rockets and TY-90 air-to-air missiles, the Z-10 is China’s frontline attack helicopter.

""It also has a laser target designator, which could allow it to provide guidance support for missiles fired by the Burraq armed drones.""

Reports suggest technicians are working to quickly familiarise themselves with these new helicopters by installing rotor blades and other parts for flight, and then combat.

The Z-10 will supplement Pakistan’s arsenal of 51 aging American built AH-1 “Cobra” attack helicopters, and a successful trail by combat would make the Z-10 quite attractive to other foreign buyers.

The article originally appeared on Business Insider.

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Posted · Report post

I saw this coming since IDEAS 2014:

The Government of Pakistan has requested a possible sale of 15 AH-1Z Viper Attack Helicopters, 32 T-700 GE 401C Engines (30 installed and 2 spares), 1000 AGM-114 R Hellfire II Missiles in containers, 36 H-1 Technical Refresh Mission computers, 17 AN/AAQ-30 Target Sight Systems, 30 629F-23 Ultra High Frequency/Very High Frequency Communication Systems, 19 H-764 Embedded Global Positioning System/Inertial Navigation Systems, 32 Helmet Mounted Display/Optimized Top Owl, 17 APX-117A Identification Friend or Foe, 17 AN/AAR-47 Missile Warning Systems, 17 AN/ALE-47 Countermeasure Dispenser Sets, 18 AN/APR-39C(V)2 Radar Warning Receivers, 15 Joint Mission Planning Systems, and 17 M197 20mm Gun Systems. Also included are system integration and testing, software development and integration, aircraft ferry, support equipment, spare and repair parts, tools and test equipment, publications and technical documentation, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. government and contractor engineering, technical, and logistics support services, and other related elements of logistics and program support. The total estimated cost is $952 million.

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The U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) has evolved their Bell AH-1W SuperCobra (highly capable twin engine Cobra) significantly into the Z-variant with the new designation AH-1Z Viper. Similarly with their advancement of the Huey to the Bell UH-1Y Venom the Vipers are more than an improvement as they have a four rotor blade system, as opposed to the previous twin rotor blade, of previous models — as well as much more power. The USMC has also greatly simplified aviation logistics with regard to Vipers and Venoms since they share tail booms, engines (2 x GE T700-GE-401C turboshaft at 1800 shp/1340kW), drivetrains as well as avionics — there is commonality greater than 80% which should also keep costs in check as well as easing logistic duties. The four blade rotor system no longer has hinges or bearings (only 25% of the number of original parts hence 75% less things to fail) which revolutionizes the helicopter’s performance envelope. The Viper’s wing stubs are longer and have added wingtip stations for mounting air-to-air missiles as well as Longbow radar. The Marines have an extremely potent hunter aircraft in the Viper with a combat radius of 125 miles, a cruise speed of 184 mph and a weapons load of a chin turret 20mm rotary cannon and six pylons which can mount a mix of Hydra 70 or APKWS II rockets in 7 or 19 shot pods, up to 16 AGM-114 Hellfire missiles in 4-round pods as well as wingtip mounted AIM-9 Sidewinder missiles.

As an infantry support, anti-armor attack and anti-helicopter aircraft the Viper is formidable and can be also used to counter jet attack air aircraft in the proper circumstances such as in canyon country where the helicopter can use terrain masking to await in ambush.

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Posted · Report post

but why 15 -  this is a very low number 

 

PA need more than 15. more like 48

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1 billion for 15 is a lot of cash. When you are lending big time (IMF) you cannot throw away a few billions here and there. I think the same goes for delaying FC20. When there is no urgent need then we can skip. 

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It is a FMS funded contract and they are always overpriced and jacked up. US money going back to US companies .. It would have been great if Pakistan had used these funds (+ some more) to finance the remaining, approved, F16B52's that we initially had planned. As far as PA Aviation is concerned; hopefully, our future is with the Z10 program ..  

Khalid A., S.Q and Gaf like this

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Posted · Report post

Till the time Z 10 remains underpowered and Super Cobras are not delivered I will keep my fingers crossed.

The scouts with PA aviation are also old machines. Z 19 with mast mounted sensor suite can fill in that slot.

Regards

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Pakistan, S Korea to enhance mutual defence capabilities
 
PakistanKhawaja DaudOctober 20, 2015 6:31 pm
 
ISLAMABAD (Online) – Pakistan and South Korea have announced their interest in establishing mutually beneficial cooperation in the field of defence production and agreed to enhance capabilities by helping each other through joint ventures.
 
Minister for Defence Production Rana Tanveer Hussain is on a five day visit, along with Chairman HIT Lieutenant General Wajid Hussain, to Peoples Republic of China and South Korea.
 
The minister attended the opening ceremony of Seoul ADEX 2015 on Tuesday, and also visited Defense Acquisition Program Administration where he met the DG Defence Industry Promotion Oh Won Jin. Tanveer Hussain also met the Minister for National Defence Han Minkoo.
 
 
Talking to Korean Minster for Defence, Tanveer highlighted the strides Pakistan has made in the field of Defence Production and significantly talked about the ace aircraft JF-17 being built in Pakistan. He added that Pakistan is producing the best armament and heavy machinery.
 
“Our APCs are of B6 protection and are also developing B7 protection vehicles. These are low cost and state of the art equipment and Pakistan is proud of such developments.”
 
The minister further said the Koreans have expressed the desire to establish close ties with Pakistan. Korea has called for technology sharing in the field of defence production. He also remarked that Pakistan looks forward to exploring international markets and wants the world to support it in its endeavours.
 

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Pakistan exports Chinese HJ-8 missile to 20 nations
Staff Reporter 2015-10-27 10:52 (GMT+8)
 
With the help of Pakistan, China North Industries Corporation, better known as Norinco, has been able to export its HJ-8 anti-tank missiles to 20 countries around the world, Duowei News, a news outlet operated by overseas Chinese, reported on Oct. 21.
 
Pakistan produces the HJ-8 under license from China, which helped the South Asian country build an independent production line to manufacture the anti-tank missile.
 
In the late 1980s, China convinced the Pakistan Army, which had been using the American-built BGM-71 TOW anti-tank missile, to purchase the Chinese-made HJ-8.
 
Pakistan carried out tests pitting the HJ-8 against the TOW system to see which missile was more suited to its ground force. The HJ-8 came out on top by destroying all five targets with five launches, while the TOW only destroyed three, according to the Duowei report.
 
Nearly 10,000 HJ-8 missiles have since exported to around 20 countries. These include Bangladesh, Bolivia, Egypt, Ecuador, Kenya, Malaysia, Morocco, Peru, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, the United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Venezuela and Zimbabwe.
 
As Islamabad opens up new overseas markets for China, it also builds trust with Beijing to gain access to the further arms technology in the future, creating a win-win situation for both nations, Duowei said.
 
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Army chief arrives in Saudi Arabia on two-day official visit
 
By Web Desk
Published: November 3, 2015
 
The army chief meeting Saudi Chief of General Staff A Reham Bin Saleh during a two-day official visit to Saudi Arabia on November 2, 2015. PHOTO: ISPR
 
Chief of Army Staff General Raheel Sharif received a warm welcome in Saudi Arabia on Tuesday as he reached the kingdom on a two-day official visit, Director General Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR) Asim Bajwa said.
 
According to the ISPR, the army chief met Saudi Chief of General Staff A Reham Bin Saleh and discussed military relations, defence cooperation, and regional security situation.
 
Renewed commitment: Army chief vows to defend S Arabia
 
General Raheel will meet military and political leadership of Saudi Arabia during the visit, the ISPR added.
 
On October 30, the COAS had said any threat to the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Saudi Arabia will evoke a strong response from Pakistan.
 

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Daily Jang is reporting while quoting Sputnik that Russia is holding discussing with Pakistan to establish a Helicopter overhaul and repair & Maintenance facility in Pakistan.

This probably would mean we can overhaul and service not only our own Helis but also our partners.

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Vice chairman Chinese military meets Pakistan Navy chief
 
By Web DeskPublished: November 13, 2015
 
Vice Chairman of Central Military Commission of China General Fan Changlong called on the chief of the naval staff Admiral Muhammad Zakaullah during his official visit to Pakistan on Friday.
 
According to a statement, detailed discussions were held on professional matters as well as on the security situation in Indian Ocean, maritime security cooperation and operational development.
 
General Changlong also paid a visit to Pakistan Navy Ship Aslat, constructed indigenously in collaboration with People’s Republic of China.
 
Vice Chairman of Central Military C ommission of People’s Republic of China, General Fan Changlong meets Naval Chief Admiral M Zakaullah at Fleet Headquarters. PHOTO: PAKISTAN NAVY
 
Commander Karachi Vice Admiral Syed Arifullah Hussaini received the dignitary upon his arrival at PNS Mehran.
 
The Chinese vice chairman was accompanied by a 24-member delegation, including vice chief of general staff, political commissar of Chengdu Military Regions Command, deputy chief of General Logistic Department and Deputy Commander of PLA Navy.
 
Top Chinese general vows to ensure CPEC security
 
A smartly turned out contingent of Pakistan Navy presented him guard of honour on his arrival onboard the ship.
 
Earlier on Friday, Changlong met army chief General Raheel Sharif and pledged that Beijing looked forward to ensure proper management and security of the China Pakistan Economic Corridor project.
 

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General Raheel Sharif decorated with Brazil's 'Order of Merit'
DAWN.COM — PUBLISHED ABOUT 6 HOURS AGO
 
BRASILIA: The Chief of Army Staff General Raheel Sharif on Wednesday was awarded Brazil's coveted 'Order of Merit' award in a ceremony held in the South American country.
 
General Raheel Sharif is also the first Asian to have received the award.
 
 
The chief of army staff was given the award in recognition of his leadership in the fight against terrorism and other threats.
 
 
General Raheel Sharif also met the Brazilian minister of defence and offered security assistance from Pakistan for the upcoming 2016 Olympics games due to be held in the South American country.
 
 
Also discussed on the occasion were matters related to the anti-narcotics effort in both countries.
 
Earlier in the week, General Raheel Sharif on Monday met the Chief of the Joint Staff of the Armed Forces of Brazil Gen José Carlos de Nardi, who hailed the Pakistan Army's professionalism and operational achievements especially in ongoing counter-terrorism operations.
 
Army Chief Gen Raheel Sharif arrived in Brazil after a five-day visit to Washington during which he met US Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State John Kerry, Secretary of Defence Ashton Carter and other senior officials.
 
From Brazil, he will go to Ivory Coast to spend a day with Pakistani troops who were serving there as part of the UN peace keeping force.
 
His meetings in the US focused on Pak-US relations, military to military ties, regional security and on the situation in Afghanistan, Lt Gen Bajwa said earlier.
 

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Posted · Report post

I hope our correspondents understand that such awards are given to visiting military dignitaries for their contribution to the enhancement of bi-lateral military ties and nothing more.

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I hope our correspondents understand that such awards are given to visiting military dignitaries for their contribution to the enhancement of bi-lateral military ties and nothing more.

 

I think that in itself (enhancements of relations) is a big thing, given how Pak foreign relations hagve been over the last couple of years. The welcome he has been given by Brazil, now the medal, goes to show that there is a desire to enhance bilateral relations. Which is a very good thing, as Brazil is a major regional power in South America.

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Public-private partnership in defence production
Published: December 8, 2015
1006298-TalatMasoodNew-1449593429-826-64

The writer is a retired lieutenant general of the Pakistan Army and a former federal secretary. He has also served as chairman of the Pakistan Ordnance Factories Board

At a recent seminar in Islamabad, the president made a convincing case for the virtues of engaging the private sector in defence production. The Minister for Defence Production was equally enthusiastic about a close relationship developing between the public and private sectors. Serving and retired senior military officers also endorsed this viewpoint and General Tanveer, who recently retired as secretary of Defence Production, read an elaborate paper on the merits of this partnership. It is heartening to know that there is a major shift from the mindset of the past and a growing realisation regarding the advantages of this partnership. I distinctly recall that as chairman of the Pakistan Ordnance Factories Board and later as secretary of Defence Production, there was a lot of resistance from the top brass with respect to involvement of the private sector in defence production. There was a mistaken belief in the military hierarchy that by involving the private sector, it would lose control over state-owned defence installations. To some extent, that impression still persists.

Indeed, Pakistan has come a long way in indigenous defence production, considering that at the time of Partition, it did not have any defence industrial units. All the defence industries built by the British to serve their war machine were located in India. To add to the challenges of a young nation, we had practically no civil industries either, apart from a few sugar mills and textile spinning units. The technological and industrial base was extremely weak and the military was dependent on weapons and equipment inherited from the British or imports from Western sources. But soon after the major skirmish with India in Kashmir in 1948, Prime Minister Liaquat Ali Khan decided to set up an ordnance factory to produce small arms. Initially, it was located in Rawalpindi, but later shifted to Wah where it has developed into a huge complex. Over the years, Pakistan’s defence industries have grown significantly and boast of a wide range of military hardware. This includes major weapon systems, such as armoured fighting vehicles, fighter and trainer aircraft, frigates, patrol boats, cruise missiles, intermediate range missiles, electronic and optronic devices and communication equipment. Pakistani products command the confidence of our military and have also found limited markets abroad. However, there are still major challenges that confront defence production.

The most glaring weakness of our leadership is that it lacks a clear vision regarding the integration of the private sector as a partner. Pakistan clearly needs an internationally competitive private sector participation to ensure a reliable domestic supply of technology and systems, and to contribute to the country’s overall industrial and technological development. Involvement of the private sector will also help in sustaining political support for defence production. Pakistan’s military industrial complex needs to work more closely with the private sector and build on some of its strengths. That would include employing a more rigorous methodology in production processes, as well as better costing, accounting and budgeting methods. This should be accompanied by stronger oversight and quality assurance and a concentrated effort to translate best practices into the makings of a more export-oriented defence production sector. Research and development is another critical area that the defence sector has ignored or given scant attention to. It is a short- sighted approach to merely rely on transfers of foreign technology and base the entire indigenous production on drawings and specifications supplied by foreign countries. The most critical areas for domestic research and development are communications and related equipment, explosives and propellants, the manufacture of specialised materials (such as carbon fibre, exotic alloys and hardened steels), avionics, electronics, lasers and computation.

Strategic vision demands that our leaders comprehend the importance of the defence economy in the context of the national economy and exploit its potential. This, however, would only be feasible provided our defence organisations undergo a major restructuring, become more quality sensitive, financially cost-conscious and fully utilise the potential of the private sector, which can play a major role in introducing the latest technologies, modern management practices and contemporary financial management.

The private sector should also benefit from a cross-flow of technologies from the public sector defence industries. The military spends precious foreign exchange to acquire cutting-edge technologies or spends considerable state resources in generating them in-house. Most of these technologies have common usage, but remain quarantined and the civil sectors of the economy fail to benefit fully from them. All this is only possible if there is a change in mindset in the military bureaucracy, wherein the private sector is treated as an equal partner.

Current procedures for participation of the private sector are archaic and a major revision is necessary. There are several countries that have integrated the private sector in defence production and have institutionalised interaction at regular intervals. The US, Sweden and Germany are classic examples of the success of the private sector. In these countries the private sector is producing highly sophisticated weapon systems, making these nations leaders in research and development. Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and India also have robust defence industries, producing fairly advanced military hardware and software. Most of these foreign firms are producing both military and civilian products and thereby optimising their output and reducing overhead costs. The defence economy should be directed in a way that it becomes the engine of growth rather than a drain on the already emaciated national economy.

Another major weakness in our system has been that at times, the top postings in defence production entities have not been on the basis of individuals’ suitability, but more so as a parking place before retirement. This practice, obviously, has had a corrosive effect on the organisations. I am confident that the present military leadership fully realises the key role defence production and procurement plays in strengthening national defence. Career prospects of civilian technical and administrative cadres in Pakistan’s defence industrial establishment also need to be revisited. Many of these civilians are highly professional and have devoted their lives to defence production. Recognition of their merit will attract better talent to defence establishments. The future of Pakistan’s defence industrial and technological capability lies in addressing these multiple problems satisfactorily, so that we can move towards maximum self-reliance.

Published in The Express Tribune, December 9th,  2015.

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