Wars In Iraq-Syria-Libya

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ISIL Wars within Iraq - Syria - Jordan, Middle-East, South Asia, Pakistan - Afghanistan, FOLDER

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US forces bomb Isis militant positions in northern Iraq

 

• Air strikes target frontlines around Kurdish capital of Irbil
• Deployment of US combat troops on ground ruled out
• Parallel operation to drop food for civilians on Mount Sinjar
 

US warplanes bombed Islamic militants outside the Kurdish capital of Irbil for a second time on Friday, pulling the US back into Iraq conflict for the first time since President Obama withdrew ground troops in 2011.

After initial strikes outside the Kurdish city of Irbil on Friday, the US military launched a second and third round later in the day.

 

The initial strikes were limited to the frontlines around Irbil to relieve intense pressure on US-backed Kurdish fighters, but the White House signalled it could expand its military commitment.

 

That would come only once a more "inclusive" government was formed in Baghdad, giving better representation to Iraq's alienated Sunni minority. However, the Obama administration stressed that sending combat troops back into the country was not an option.

 

The first 500lb laser-guided bombs were dropped in mid-afternoon local time by two FA-18 fighter jets flying from the USS George HW Bush aircraft carrier in the Gulf. They targeted a howitzer that fighters from the Islamic State (Isis) movement were using to shell Kurdish forces, known as peshmerga.

 

Hours later, the US launched the first drone strike in Iraq since 2011, and followed up with another round of FA-18 Super Hornet strikes, also launched from the Bush.

 

All three strikes on Friday were near the Kurdish regional capitol of Irbil, indicating that the threat to pro-US Iraqi Kurdistan has prompted Barack Obama to launch offensive action.

 

The drone hit an Isis mortar position near the city, the Pentagon said, about three hours after Friday's first fighter jet strike. A second pass by the drone killed suspected Isis militants when they "returned to the site moments later."

 

Over an hour later, four more FA-18 Super Hornets hit an Isis vehicle convoy of seven vehicles while it was parked near the city, as well as a mortar position. Two passes by the jets dropped eight laser-guided bombs.

 

Together, the three strikes suggested an air campaign to protect Iraqi Kurdistan was beginning to take shape, marking the return of US aircraft to combat in Iraq.

 

An AP correspondent at the scene reported six bombs dropped at the front at Khazer, the site of a camp for displaced Iraqi Arabs just outside Irbil, abandoned in the face of the Isis offensive. Peshmerga fighters had been told to withdraw from their positions just before the sorties began, but even so, one of the bombs landed within 100 metres of their lines.
MapofIraqairstrikes.png

 

Hours earlier, US military transport planes had launched a parallel operation to drop food and water for 40,000 civilians, Kurds mostly of the Yazidi faith, who are besieged on Mount Sinjar, on the western edge of Kurdistan's boundary with the rest of Iraq. The airdrops came after reports that children among the stranded population were beginning to die of thirst on the bare, parched mountainside.

 

Britain said the RAF would also take part in the mission to airdrop food for the stranded Yazidis. David Cameron said it was the world's duty to help religious minorities "in their hour of desperate need". The prime minister welcomed the American air strikes but ruled out British participation in military action.
The White House stressed the limited aims of the operations, aware that one of Obama's proudest achievements in office has been the extrication of America from Iraq after eight gruelling years of war.
A spokesman said that any additional support would be conditional on the formation of an "inclusive" government in Baghdad, a reflection of longstanding American discontent with the prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, who US and other western officials accuse of pursuing narrow sectarian goals in favour of his fellow Shias, and at the expense of the Sunni minority and national cohesion. One of the US arguments against using force against Isis earlier was that it might relieve pressure on Maliki to open up his government or step down.

 

The White House pledged that any additional support to a new government would not be prolonged and would not involve ground troops. Friday's air strikes were framed as being a necessary step to protect a US joint operation centre in Irbil, used to coordinate defences with peshmerga fighters.

 

"The fact of the matter is we have people in Irbil and if Irbil is allowed to fall, they will be at risk," the national security council spokesman, Ben Rhodes, said.

 

The president's orders gave his commanders discretion to use air power to protect American military advisers and diplomats in Irbil and Baghdad, and to break the siege of the Yazidis on Sinjar.

 

It was unclear how long the air strikes around Irbil might last, or how America might extricate itself from an ever evolving and deepening conflict. Isis has proved itself a formidable force, which has rapidly spread its control over a large swath of Syria and Iraq, capturing oilfields and one city after another. Its fighters have declared themselves eager to take on American troops. They have seized control of a dam near Mosul, which if destroyed, could unleash a 65ft wall of water on the valley, engulfing Iraq's second largest city.

 

The first US combat operations in Iraq since 2011 began at 1.45pm local time, when the two FA-18 Hornets took off from the USS George HW Bush aircraft carrier in the Gulf.The humanitarian airdrop operations over Mount Sinjar were carried out by giant C17 transport planes flying from an unnamed US base in the region. On a visit to India, US defense secretary Chuck Hagel told reporters that more than 60 of the 72 bundles of food and water airdropped on to the mountain reached the people stranded there. However, the Yazidis remained encircled by Isis forces, who view their ancient faith as heretical and have executed dozens, possibly hundreds of Yazidi men during their advance across the region.

 

The International Rescue Committee (IRC) said it was caring for 4,000 Yazidi refugees who had managed to cross the border into Syria. It said the refugees, mostly women and children, were dehydrated, and had survived for up to six days by hiding from Isis militants in the Sinjar mountains.

 

"Everything humanly possible must be done to prevent further tragedy from occurring on Mount Sinjar. Whether coming overland or through airdrops, there needs to be a coordinated response to ensure aid reaches the 40,000 people stranded on the mountainside," Suzanna Tkalec, IRC's Iraq director, said.
Also on Friday, British Airways announced that it was temporarily suspending flights over Iraq, while Lufthansa and Turkish Airlines suspended their flights into Irbil, which had been an island of calm in Iraq's pervasive violence in the years since the US-led 2003 invasion.

 

A representative of Iraq's most influential Shia cleric, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, called for a more comprehensive international intervention to support the Iraqi government. "The condemnation and consolation statements in support of the affected people, or sending some humanitarian aid, is not enough. Rather, solid plans, in cooperation with the Iraqi government, should be put in place to confront and eliminate the terrorists," said al-Sistani's spokesman Abdul-Mahdi al-Karbalaie in his sermon in the holy city of Karbala.
 
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/aug/08/us-iraq-air-strikes-isis-irbil

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I would like to play devils advocate: as human beings the Yezidis deserve the assistance thats being given to them. But why just them? Because Christians? Why not to the tens of thousands of refugees that were being killed in Syria. Why did they not get food drops?

 

Superior defenses in Syria?

 

I am not suggesting a massive anti-muslim conspirancy: was it a military reason not to help because Syria is not ISIS, or was it preference to save a race.

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I would like to play devils advocate: as human beings the Yezidis deserve the assistance thats being given to them. But why just them? Because Christians? Why not to the tens of thousands of refugees that were being killed in Syria. Why did they not get food drops?

 

Superior defenses in Syria?

 

I am not suggesting a massive anti-muslim conspirancy: was it a military reason not to help because Syria is not ISIS, or was it preference to save a race.

 

Yezidis are not Christians:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yazidi

 

There are tens of thousands of helpless people perched on top of a mountain surrounded on all side by blood thirsty animals in a country that was shattered by US invasion. Maybe that alone makes it more of US responsibility than Syria. In Syria US has been delegating the prosecution of intervention to Turkey. Turkey has been using its borders for arming the opposition forces and for hosting hundreds of thousands of refugees. A large number of refugees also went to Jordan, again a country that is part of US policy orbit and receives material US support.

 

The support in this case is just so that Peshmarga can open up a corridor for these surrounded people towards Turkey as well as Kurdish controlled areas in Iraq and Syria. If you find that something to play devil's advocate on then God save your soul. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VGpv5ezOjE

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Yezidis are not Christians:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yazidi

 

There are tens of thousands of helpless people perched on top of a mountain surrounded on all side by blood thirsty animals in a country that was shattered by US invasion. Maybe that alone makes it more of US responsibility than Syria. In Syria US has been delegating the prosecution of intervention to Turkey. Turkey has been using its borders for arming the opposition forces and for hosting hundreds of thousands of refugees. A large number of refugees also went to Jordan, again a country that is part of US policy orbit and receives material US support.

 

The support in this case is just so that Peshmarga can open up a corridor for these surrounded people towards Turkey as well as Kurdish controlled areas in Iraq and Syria. If you find that something to play devil's advocate on then God save your soul. 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VGpv5ezOjE

There is no reason to insult. My soul and God is my business with my God. You should pray for yourself and those that know you and would value your suggestions on what they should do with God.

 

I had confused the Yezedi situation with the large scale ethnic cleansing of christians that was taking place. They are obviously not one in the same.

 

 You didn't read all the pre-qualifiers I put in there and rushed to judgment.

Your basic English skills should let you know that my point was not to question why Yezidis should or should not be helped, but that with the hundereds of thousands across the region that are victims of this sort of mass murder in Syria, (I am not including Gaza), why are they the only ones getting air drops. Not all refugees in Syria have made it to Turkey or Lebanon. Many hundreds of thousands are surrounded in towns like Aleppo.  They may not be on top of a mountain but they also don't have food supplies.

 

Unlike you, I am not a drone of CNN/FOX that should just assume that because they decide that one population should be saved, that automatically that population is superior to all other populations. There is a larger strategic aim to this, and I raised the question to know from those informed members on the forum (that are not judgmental) to give their view on the situation.

 

You should keep your views to yourself in the future if you can't help yourself from passing judgement. If I blindly wanted to follow what the press says like a dud, then I wouldn't waste time at this forum and just cruise all the cable channels for the party line and not exercise my brain cells at all.

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Perhaps that one line that is main topic of your above screed was out of order. But then i guess that whole CNN/Fox generalization is pretty much in same vein. The reason i posted link to that clip was not to establish my CNN/Fox cred with you(not sure what gave you that idea) but because it has Obama's speech stating the 'official reasoning'.

 

On your original post

 

I would like to play devils advocate: as human beings the Yezidis deserve the assistance thats being given to them. But why just them? Because Christians? Why not to the tens of thousands of refugees that were being killed in Syria. Why did they not get food drops?

Superior defenses in Syria?

I am not suggesting a massive anti-muslim conspirancy: was it a military reason not to help because Syria is not ISIS, or was it preference to save a race.

 

Even though you mention that you are not suggesting conspiracy this whole Christian / Race angle sounds just that to me with all due respect. I am not asking you to stop using your 'brain cells'. In fact if you were exercising your brain cells you would have realized that religion is not same as race. In all likelihood Yezidis are racially related to Sunni Kurds and ancient Christian Chaldeans who share the same milieu, but happen to be practicing a different faith. Secondly, Christians in Syria are closely allied with Asad regime and US policy to unseat Asad regime actually puts these Christians at cross purpose with US policy in Syria. It wouldn't make much sense for US to be undermining the regime that Christians are clinging on to for their survival, if US was really pursuing a preference policy for M.E Christians. The same holds true in Gaza/Palestine, where US backing of Israel's forced displacement of Palestinians is a catastrophe for Palestinian Christians who roughly constitute ~10% of Palestinians.

 

My last post to you.

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Perhaps that one line that is main topic of your above screed was out of order. But then i guess that whole CNN/Fox generalization is pretty much in same vein. The reason i posted link to that clip was not to establish my CNN/Fox cred with you(not sure what gave you that idea) but because it has Obama's speech stating the 'official reasoning'.

 

On your original post

 

Even though you mention that you are not suggesting conspiracy this whole Christian / Race angle sounds just that to me with all due respect. I am not asking you to stop using your 'brain cells'. In fact if you were exercising your brain cells you would have realized that religion is not same as race. In all likelihood Yezidis are racially related to Sunni Kurds and ancient Christian Chaldeans who share the same milieu, but happen to be practicing a different faith. Secondly, Christians in Syria are closely allied with Asad regime and US policy to unseat Asad regime actually puts these Christians at cross purpose with US policy in Syria. It wouldn't make much sense for US to be undermining the regime that Christians are clinging on to for their survival, if US was really pursuing a preference policy for M.E Christians. The same holds true in Gaza/Palestine, where US backing of Israel's forced displacement of Palestinians is a catastrophe for Palestinian Christians who roughly constitute ~10% of Palestinians.

 

My last post to you.

Yes thank you for the 'official reasoning'. I have seen other official reasoning such as WMD as a basis to justify the dismantling of an entire country of Iraq that is ultimately at the root-cause of this issue with Yazadis.

 

This is also similar to the official reasoning that Israel is fighting in self-defense. So you can believe in the official reasoning for your analysis for processing power for your brain, but its not true for the rest of the thinking population who would prefer to think past the party line.

 

If you looked at my note, it wasn't why the US wasn't helping Christians. It was why this humanitarian gesture to airdrop food wasn't being applied in equal principle in Syria where tens of thousands were blockaded and bombarded by air. There are likely military and policy differences that result in this double standard and that was the reason for the post.

 

Your last post on this topic is much appreciated. We all have links to CNN and Fox URLS and can find the official line ourselves and you posting what Obama or State Dept is saying is pretty worthless.

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Iran 'sent soldiers to fight in Iraq'
 
Hundreds of Iranian troops crossed border to join battle against Islamic State group, sources tell Al Jazeera.
Last updated: 23 Aug 2014 18:08
 
 
Roadside bombs planted by the Islamic State group are making it difficult for Kurdish forces to advance [Reuters]
Hundreds of Iranian soldiers have taken part in a joint operation inside Iraq with Kurdish forces to retake a town held by the Islamic State group, security sources have told Al Jazeera.
 
It is believed to be the first time that Iranian troops have been directly involved in the fighting against the Sunni rebel group group on this scale.
 
 
 
An estimated 1,500 Iranian fighters crossed the border on Friday in a joint operation with Kurdish Peshmerga forces to take back Jalawla in Diyala province, an official Kurdish source who asked not to be identified, told Al Jazeera.
 
He said the Iranian forces retreated back across the border early on Saturday after a failed attempt to retake the town.
 
Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Marzieh Afkham dismissed the reports of any Iranian military presence in Iraq.
 
According to the official IRNA news agency, she said Tehran "has a close watch on field developments in Iraq sensitively with regards to mutual cooperation and international commitments and takes into consideration cooperation with the Iraqi government".
 
Jalawla, fewer than 30km from the Iranian border, is a strategic point for both Iraq and Iran.
 
"Previously there had been Iranian assistance with security advisers and Iranian backed militias, but this does seem to the the first time soldiers have been involved," Al Jazeera's Jane Arraf reported from Erbil, capital of the autonomous Kurdish region.
 
Kurdish officials said their forces had surrounded Jalawla but have so far been unable to advance because of roadside bombs placed by Islamic State fighters.
 
The Islamic State controls large swaths of land in northern Iraq and neighbouring Syria. The US earlier this month launched air strikes to help Iraqi federal troops and Peshmerga stop the group's advance.
 
Speaking to Al Jazeera, Reza Marashi from the National Iranian American Council said that the Islamic State group is "making for strange bedfellows".
 
"The current government in Iraq, the Kurds, the US, Europe, Iran, are all finding common cause and stability because the Islamic State group presents a threat to each of these respective actors.
 
"In the past Iraq was an area where all of these countries were fighting each other, overtly or covertly. It is very noteworthy that Arab and Western governments are not complaining about Iran being involved as they have the same goal."
 
Marashi said that Iran and the US would not fight alongside each other but have probably divided tasks.
 
He also said it was unlikely that Iran would massively increase its presence.
 
"Traditionally Iran uses money, intelligence and weapons to achieve its objectives. There won't be a massive escalation because there is a fear of mission creep inside Iran."
 

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This is also how they are flyign the Russian supplied SU-25s. According to the print edition of Aviation Week (don't have a link), the most likely source of pilots for those SU-25s is from Iran, who ironically fly the same a/c but are of Iraqi origin, from Desert Storm vintage

 

Iran 'sent soldiers to fight in Iraq'
 
Hundreds of Iranian troops crossed border to join battle against Islamic State group, sources tell Al Jazeera.
Last updated: 23 Aug 2014 18:08
 
 
Roadside bombs planted by the Islamic State group are making it difficult for Kurdish forces to advance [Reuters]
Hundreds of Iranian soldiers have taken part in a joint operation inside Iraq with Kurdish forces to retake a town held by the Islamic State group, security sources have told Al Jazeera.
 
It is believed to be the first time that Iranian troops have been directly involved in the fighting against the Sunni rebel group group on this scale.
 
 
 
An estimated 1,500 Iranian fighters crossed the border on Friday in a joint operation with Kurdish Peshmerga forces to take back Jalawla in Diyala province, an official Kurdish source who asked not to be identified, told Al Jazeera.
 
He said the Iranian forces retreated back across the border early on Saturday after a failed attempt to retake the town.
 
Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Marzieh Afkham dismissed the reports of any Iranian military presence in Iraq.
 
According to the official IRNA news agency, she said Tehran "has a close watch on field developments in Iraq sensitively with regards to mutual cooperation and international commitments and takes into consideration cooperation with the Iraqi government".
 
Jalawla, fewer than 30km from the Iranian border, is a strategic point for both Iraq and Iran.
 
"Previously there had been Iranian assistance with security advisers and Iranian backed militias, but this does seem to the the first time soldiers have been involved," Al Jazeera's Jane Arraf reported from Erbil, capital of the autonomous Kurdish region.
 
Kurdish officials said their forces had surrounded Jalawla but have so far been unable to advance because of roadside bombs placed by Islamic State fighters.
 
The Islamic State controls large swaths of land in northern Iraq and neighbouring Syria. The US earlier this month launched air strikes to help Iraqi federal troops and Peshmerga stop the group's advance.
 
Speaking to Al Jazeera, Reza Marashi from the National Iranian American Council said that the Islamic State group is "making for strange bedfellows".
 
"The current government in Iraq, the Kurds, the US, Europe, Iran, are all finding common cause and stability because the Islamic State group presents a threat to each of these respective actors.
 
"In the past Iraq was an area where all of these countries were fighting each other, overtly or covertly. It is very noteworthy that Arab and Western governments are not complaining about Iran being involved as they have the same goal."
 
Marashi said that Iran and the US would not fight alongside each other but have probably divided tasks.
 
He also said it was unlikely that Iran would massively increase its presence.
 
"Traditionally Iran uses money, intelligence and weapons to achieve its objectives. There won't be a massive escalation because there is a fear of mission creep inside Iran."
 

 

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When history is finally written of the last century and counting, I wonder how much of the blame will be placed at the saudi ruling family and
their interference in conflicts outside of the kingdom.  
 
ISIS – FIGHTING THE MODERN WAHABIS
by Eric Margolis | No Comments | Add a Comment
 
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November 22, 2014
Sir John Baggot Glubb, better known as Glubb Pasha, was one of the modern Mideast’s most colorful and romantic figures. He and ‘Chinese’ Gordon of Khartoum were the last of the great British imperial officers.
Seconded by Britain to its protectorate, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, Glubb built up its small Bedouin army, the Arab Legion, into the Arab world’s finest military force.
Glubb’s Arab Legion would likely have defeated Israel’s forces in the 1948 Arab-Israeli War had Britain and Jordan’s double-dealing king Abdullah not blocked the Legion’s advance, as Glubb Pasha bitterly recalled in his memoires.
When asked which of his many medals and honors he valued most, Glubb surprisingly replied , “Defender of the Shepherds of Iraq, ” This obscure award was conferred upon Glubb by the King of Iraq when Sir John commanded the Iraq Border Constabulary during the 1930’s.
Glubb Pasha and his men had waged a long campaign against the Ikhwan of Saudi Arabia. The Ikhwan (Brotherhood) was a collection of fanatical Saudi tribesmen imbued with the puritan desert creed of Wahabism. They saw all non-Wahabi Muslims as infidels (kufr), fair game to be robbed or killed. Even the king of Saudi Arabia failed to control the marauding Ikhwan.
Eight decades later, the Ikhwan is back, this time with heavy weapons. Instead of camels and horses, its men are riding Toyota Land Cruisers and American Humvees captured from Iraq’s puppet army. The Ikhwan in Syria and Iraq now calls itself, the Islamic State.
There is nothing Islamic about the Islamic State, or ISIS. It is not a state. What we are seeing is the recrudescence of the fanatical Wahabi movement from Saudi Arabia combined with a bizarre modern form of violent Arab anarchism and nihilism embraced by bitter, marginalized young men from the Mideast and Europe who have too much testosterone, too little sense, and deep anger from being discriminated against in Europe. They are Europe’s forgotten underclass among whom unemployment is over 60% and drug dealing endemic.
ISIS is also pure blowback from western imperial bungling in the Mideast. The fanatical group was formed and armed in Jordan by CIA, British, French and Turkish intelligence, and funded by Saudi Arabia.
ISIS, in Washington’s thinking, was supposed to be composed of “moderates,” a short-lived, easily controlled force used to overthrow Syria’s government, which had been marked for death by the western powers for refusing to turn against ally Iran.
As often in the past, the Saudis sought to use militants, in this latest case ISIS, as a tool to vent revolution away from their borders. The Saudis contribution to ISIS was arms, cash and Wahabi fanaticism. Ironically, while the world recoiled in horror at ISIS beheadings, its Saudi patrons cut off the heads of 27 prisoners at the same time – without hardly any notice from the western media.
But the ISIS Frankenstein quickly ran out of control and turned on its creators.
The next step in this disaster was to further widen the chasm between Sunni and Shia. Soon after invading Iraq in 2003, the US, in the best imperial divide and conquer policy, made an alliance with the Shia majority against the nation’s Sunni minority. The strategy of using Shia against Sunni was highly successful in keeping US control of Iraq. Washington even quietly aligned itself with Tehran over Iraq.
Shia death squads were unleashed against Sunni regions; Shia torturers used electrical drills and acid to make Sunni prisoners talk and break the anti-US resistance. The US funded and abetted this dirty war, using technique perfected in Central America’s civil wars. Israel provided much useful advice.
Turning Shia against Sunnis “stabilized” Iraq, but it intensified dangerous tensions across the Muslim world all the way east to Pakistan. The long proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iranian intensified.
As religious hatred was being fanned, out of the bowels of the Mideast came the ferocious ISIS claiming to be waging jihad against Shia “unbelievers” and “apostates,” among them the Assad Alawite regime in Syria. ISIS became Saudi Arabia’s weapon of choice. But then ISIS turned on the US-installed regime in Iraq and routed its toy soldiers.
Throw into this witch’s brew the hatred and fury of the Arab world that has been invaded, bombed and exploited by the western colonial powers for a century. The US has committed acts of war against at least ten Muslim nations in our era, killing untold numbers of people and imposing ruthless tyrants as overseers, all under the banner of fighting “terrorism.”
Can there be any doubt that the thirst for revenge is intense? These are the sons of the aborted “Arab Spring” that has withered and died under western and Saudi counter-revolution. They are the cousins of the 9/11 hijackers – who were mostly from Saudi Arabia.
ISIS uses the idiom of Islam, but it’s a bloodthirsty mob of enraged young men who understand little about Islam. Their stupid brutality is stirring up intense Islamophobia everywhere.
Interestingly, there is an ancient Muslim saying (hadith) that warns of the coming of dangerous men with black flags, phony geographical names and long hair.
They appear to have finally arrived. Now it’s up to the Muslim world, not outsiders, to eradicate this lethal plague of 20-something crusaders.
copyright Eric S. Margolis 2014
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Looks like he finally found out about the worth of South Asians in the eyes of our Gulf-Arab friends. 

 

http://www.dawn.com/news/1148082/indian-is-recruit-goes-home-after-having-to-clean-toilets-reports

 

Indian IS recruit goes home after having to clean toilets: reports

 

NEW DELHI: An Indian student who travelled to Iraq to join the Islamic State group has returned home disillusioned after jihadists made him clean toilets and do other menial jobs, according to media reports.

Areeb Majeed, 23, left for Iraq with three friends in late May amid fears by authorities that IS militants were attempting to recruit from India's large pool of young Muslim men.

The engineering student flew home Friday to Mumbai where he was arrested and charged by India's elite National Investigation Agency (NIA) with terror-related offences.

Majeed told NIA officers he was sidelined by the jihadists for whom he fetched water and performed other lowly tasks such as cleaning toilets, instead of taking part in the deadly offensive like he wanted, the Press Trust of India news agency reported.

He phoned his family to say he wanted to come home after suffering an unexplained bullet wound for which he did not get proper medical attention, the agency said late Sunday.

“Only after I begged them, I was taken to a hospital,” he was quoted as saying by NIA officers. “There was neither a holy war nor any of the preachings in the holy book were followed."

India's moderate population of 150 million Muslims have traditionally not been drawn into sectarian conflicts in the Middle East and elsewhere, but the case of the four raised concerns about online recruitment.

Al Qaeda announced in September a new chapter of its extremist movement charged with waging jihad in South Asia, prompting several Indian states to be placed on high alert.

Tanvir Sheikh, the father of one of Majeed's friends who was still missing in Iraq, said he felt betrayed by his son.

Sheikh said his son Fahad was offered a job in Kuwait but instead decided to travel to Iraq to join the extremists.

“He had got a job offer from Kuwait with a salary of three lakh rupees ($4,800) but he ignored that and instead took up arms. Now what happens to his future?” Sheikh told the Indian Express newspaper on Monday.

“I feel let down by my son. He had a bright career ahead of him but he took advantage of our love and betrayed us."

Radicalised foreigners have been drawn to the IS group, which has conducted a series of mass executions and other atrocities since launching its offensive in Iraq and Syria in June.

 

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Looks like he finally found out about the worth of South Asians in the eyes of our Gulf-Arab friends. 

 

http://www.dawn.com/news/1148082/indian-is-recruit-goes-home-after-having-to-clean-toilets-reports

 

Indian IS recruit goes home after having to clean toilets: reports

 

NEW DELHI: An Indian student who travelled to Iraq to join the Islamic State group has returned home disillusioned after jihadists made him clean toilets and do other menial jobs, according to media reports.

Areeb Majeed, 23, left for Iraq with three friends in late May amid fears by authorities that IS militants were attempting to recruit from India's large pool of young Muslim men.

The engineering student flew home Friday to Mumbai where he was arrested and charged by India's elite National Investigation Agency (NIA) with terror-related offences.

Majeed told NIA officers he was sidelined by the jihadists for whom he fetched water and performed other lowly tasks such as cleaning toilets, instead of taking part in the deadly offensive like he wanted, the Press Trust of India news agency reported.

He phoned his family to say he wanted to come home after suffering an unexplained bullet wound for which he did not get proper medical attention, the agency said late Sunday.

“Only after I begged them, I was taken to a hospital,” he was quoted as saying by NIA officers. “There was neither a holy war nor any of the preachings in the holy book were followed."

India's moderate population of 150 million Muslims have traditionally not been drawn into sectarian conflicts in the Middle East and elsewhere, but the case of the four raised concerns about online recruitment.

Al Qaeda announced in September a new chapter of its extremist movement charged with waging jihad in South Asia, prompting several Indian states to be placed on high alert.

Tanvir Sheikh, the father of one of Majeed's friends who was still missing in Iraq, said he felt betrayed by his son.

Sheikh said his son Fahad was offered a job in Kuwait but instead decided to travel to Iraq to join the extremists.

“He had got a job offer from Kuwait with a salary of three lakh rupees ($4,800) but he ignored that and instead took up arms. Now what happens to his future?” Sheikh told the Indian Express newspaper on Monday.

“I feel let down by my son. He had a bright career ahead of him but he took advantage of our love and betrayed us."

Radicalised foreigners have been drawn to the IS group, which has conducted a series of mass executions and other atrocities since launching its offensive in Iraq and Syria in June.

 

 

That is reality of Khilafat  and Pakistani Mullah's concept of United Umma without going in details of ethnic , economic , social and political differences between diverse

Muslim population  spread around globe..Whole notion of political Islam ideas comming form JI to ISIS and every thing in between are simply based on twisting of truth. 

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In contrast to ‪#‎alQaeda‬‪#‎ISIS‬ has not made the ‪#‎US‬ and its allies its main target," writes Ahmed Rashid. "Where al-Qaeda directed its anger at the 'distant enemy,' the ‪#‎UnitedStates‬, ISIS wants to destroy the near enemy, the Arab regimes, first. This is above all a war within ‪#‎Islam‬."

 

Anyone in our country who wants to support these disgusting rabid dogs of ‪#‎ISIL‬ ‪#‎Daish‬ ‪#‎Daesh‬ ‪#‎IslamicState‬ ‪#‎IS‬ should consider this: they are NOT America's or the West's or Israel's enemy; they are the enemies of‪ #‎Muslims‬. They are here to wage mass-slaughter on Muslim people.

 

ISIS: What the US Doesn't Understand by Ahmed Rashid : http://www.nybooks.com/…/dec/02/isis-what-us-doesnt-unders…/

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News is coming out that a Jordanian Airforce F-16 part of the American coalition against ISIS has gone down in ISIS territory with its pilot captured: 

 

BBC News - Islamic State 'shoots down coalition plane in Syria'

Islamic State (IS) militants have shot down a US-led coalition warplane over northern Syria, activists say.

The Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the aircraft, believed to be from an Arab state, went down near Raqqa.

The UK-based group said the fate of the pilot was unknown, but IS supporters published photos they said showed a Jordanian airman surrounded by gunmen.

Jordan is one of four Arab countries whose aircraft have been bombing IS positions in Syria since September.

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What did they shoot it down with?

In addition to the SAMs, the ISIS folks are also in possession of 20 M1A2 tanks taken from Iraqi Army inventory.

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What did they shoot it down with?

In addition to the SAMs, the ISIS folks are also in possession of 20 M1A2 tanks taken from Iraqi Army inventory.

 

Apparently he was shot down by a shoulder fired FN-6 missile. He was flying too low.

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http://theaviationist.com/2014/12/24/rjaf-f-16-downed-by-isis/

 

Ssaad saheb...

 

Even if the US takes back their downed pilots they are stripped... It is just a security meassure to avoid getting something explosives on board... You never know. Maybe they wanted to be sure that this person has no bugs, weapons before getting him.

 

Another one is humiliation. And easy to track him by all others.

 

Seems to be F16. I am pretty much shocked that this happened. Why did the pilot got low?

 

Without getting into discussion whether it is good or bad... If F16's are going to be shot down, I am not happy anyone getting these weapons. This is getting to be a big problem for the world. We know tons of these weapons are stolen from Syria, Libya and maybe even Egypt. It will be a risk to civilians outside these area's and maybe even to our pilots when bombing terrorists.

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I think the stripping was for identification whether he is a Muslim or not. Humiliation could be another aspect. Doubt he would be released. Pilots and snipers are usually not given much leeway specially given he is Jordanian and ISIS will probably want to make a statement so it desists other Arab countries from participating. One can imagine he is probably getting taunts for being an apostate and what not for participating in this campaign against them.

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Thats unfortunate. It does give ISIS a morale booster and removes the air of invincibility of aircraft. Assuming there were any US UAVs in the area coordinating the strike, I would like to think that they circled long enough to be able to track movements to be able to tell where he was taken. At this point the pilot' best bet is to be killed in an airstrike from coalition vs. being a public display for decapitation.

SSAAD likes this

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BBC reporting, that according to the US military, the plane crashed and it wasn't shot down.

ndad

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Assalamaoalauakum,

 

No one was shot down in Serbia.

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Scott O' Grady's F-16 was shot down by an SA-6 over Serbia in 1995. He avoided capture while being pursued for a week and was rescued by Marines and extracted eventually.

 

In 06 a mock dogfight between  Greek and Turkish F-16 resulted in a mid-air collision. They consider themselves adversaries since it wasn't a friendly staged encounter.

 

I seem to think that may be an F-16 during Lebanon invasion in 1982, but don't know 100%.

 

Mechanical failure possibility on this one would make sense: he must have been in low orbit. If he were at 20K feet and failure, you would have been able to get to a safer location so he wasn't captured right away.

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